Dec 11

IRA Financial Group Releases Cryptocurrency E-Info Kit for Solo 401(K) Plan Investors

New Bitcoin E-Kit will help investors understand how to purchase cryptocurrencies with 401(k) funds

IRA Financial Group, the leading provider of self-directed IRA LLC and Solo 401(k) Plans, announces the launch of a new Cryptocurrency E-Info Kit. The free cryptocurrency information kit will help retirement account holders looking to purchase cryptocurrencies, such as Bitcoins, with their retirement accounts to better understand what is involved in the process. “The IRA Financial Group Crypto E-Info Kit will help guide retirement account holders looking to use a Solo 401(k) plan to buy cryptocurrencies, such as bitcoins,” stated Adam Bergman, a partner with the IRA Financial Group.

IRA Financial Group’s Crypto 401(k) platform with checkbook control will allow retirement account holders to buy, sell, or hold Bitcoins and other cryptocurrency assets and generate tax-deferred or tax-free gains, in the case of a Roth Solo 401(k). The primary advantage of using a Solo 401(k) to make Bitcoin investments is that all income and gains associated with the 401(k) investment grow tax-deferred.IRA Financial Group Releases Cryptocurrency E-Info Kit for Solo 401(K) Plan Investors

IRA Financial Group is the market’s leading provider of self-directed retirement plans. IRA Financial Group has helped thousands of clients take back control over their retirement funds while gaining the ability to invest in almost any type of investment, including real estate without custodian consent. The IRA Financial Trust Company, a self-directed IRA custodian, was founded by Adam Bergman, a partner with the IRA Financial Group.

IRA Financial Group is the market’s leading provider of self-directed retirement plans. IRA Financial Group has helped thousands of clients take back control over their retirement funds while gaining the ability to invest in almost any type of investment, including real estate without custodian consent.

Adam Bergman, IRA Financial Group partner, has written six books the topic of self-directed retirement plans, including, “The Checkbook IRA”, “Going Solo,” Turning Retirement Funds into Start-Up Dreams, Solo 401(k) Plan in a Nutshell, Self-Directed IRA in a Nutshell, and in God We Trust in Roth We Prosper.

To learn more about the IRA Financial Group please visit our website at http://www.irafinancialgroup.com or call 800-472-0646.

IRA Financial Group Facebook pageIRA Financial Group Twitter pageamazon-logoIRA Financial Group Tumblr pageIRA Financial Group Pinterest page

Dec 04

2017 Solo 401(k) Contribution Deadline

The deadline for making Solo 401K Plan contributions is typically dependent on the type of entity that has adopted the Solo 401K Plan as well as the type of contribution – employee deferral vs. profit sharing contribution.

Sole Proprietorship

2017 Solo 401(k) Contribution DeadlineEmployee Deferral

In the case of a sole proprietorship, a business owner under the age of 50 may make employee deferral contributions up to $18,000 for 2017 (an employee over the age of 50 may make a $6,000 annual catch-up contribution for an annual deferral contribution imitation of $24,000). An Employee must elect to make the employee deferral contribution by December 31 of the year. However, the employer deferral contribution can be made up until the tax-filing deadline.

The employee deferral contribution can be made using pre-tax and/or after-tax (Roth) funds.

Profit Sharing Contribution

The sole proprietorship business may make annual profit sharing contributions for the business owner and spouse annually. Internal Revenue Code Section 401(a)(3) states that the amount of employer contributions is limited to 25 percent of the entity’s income subject to self-employment tax. Schedule C sole-proprietors must do an added calculation starting with earned income to determine their maximum contribution, which, in effect, brings the maximum 25% of compensation limit down to 20% of earned income. A step-by-step worksheet for this calculation can be found in IRS Publication 560. In general, compensation is your net earnings from self-employment. This definition takes into account both of the following items: (i) the deduction for one-half of your self-employment tax, and (ii) the deduction for contributions on your behalf to the plan.

The profit sharing contribution must be made by the business’s tax-filing deadline.

Single Member LLC

Employee Deferral

In the case of a single member LLC, the single member LLC owner under the age of age 50 may make employee deferral contributions up to $18,000 for 2017 (an employee over the age of 50 may make a $6,000 annual catch-up contribution for an annual deferral contribution limitation of $24,000). The single member LLC owner must elect to make the employee deferral contribution by December 31 of the year. However, the employer deferral contribution can be made up until the tax-filing deadline.

The employee deferral contribution can be made using pre-tax and/or after-tax (Roth) funds.

Profit Sharing Contribution

The single Member LLC business may make annual profit sharing contributions for the business owner and spouse annually. Internal Revenue Code Section 401(a)(3) states that the amount of employer contributions is limited to 25 percent of the entity’s income subject to self- employment tax. Schedule C single member LLC owners must do an added calculation starting with earned income to determine their maximum contribution, which, in effect, brings the maximum 25% of compensation limit down to 20% of earned income. A step-by-step worksheet for this calculation can be found in IRS Publication 560. In general, compensation is your net earnings from self-employment. This definition takes into account both of the following items: (i) the deduction for one-half of your self-employment tax, and (ii) the deduction for contributions on your behalf to the plan.

Profit-sharing contributions must be funded by the business’s tax-filing deadline.

Multiple-Member LLC

Employee Deferral

In the case of a multiple member LLC, the multiple-member LLC owners under the age of age 50 may make employee deferral contributions up to $18,000 for 2017 (an employee over the age of 50 may make a $6,000 annual catch-up contribution for an annual deferral contribution limitation of $24,000). The multiple-member LLC owners must elect to make the employee deferral contribution by December 31 of the year. However, the employee deferral contribution can be made up until the tax-filing deadline.

The employee deferral contribution can be made using pre-tax and/or after-tax (Roth) funds.

Profit Sharing Contribution

The multiple-member LLC business may make annual profit sharing contributions for the business owners annually. Internal Revenue Code Section 401(a)(3) states that the amount of employer profit sharing contributions is limited to 25 percent of the entity’s income subject to self-employment tax. Profit-sharing contributions must be funded by the business’s tax-filing deadline.

C Corporation & S Corporation

Employee Deferral

An employee of a corporation will receive a W-2. When it comes to making employee deferral contributions, the employee must make the deferral contribution during the year. The timing of the deferral contribution will typically depend on the business. In the case of a corporation that uses a payroll company, the employee deferral will typically be deducted from the employee’s paycheck. If the company does not use a payroll system, the employee can elect to make deferral contributions at anytime during the year. Once the election is made the Department of Labor safe harbor is that the funds are deposited into the Solo 401(k) Plan account within 7 days. The employee making the employee contribution should make sure that he or she has earned enough compensation during the pay period to cover the employee contribution. For example, if the employee wishes to make a employee deferral contribution of $18,000 on December 30th, the employee will need to be sure that he or she has earned sufficient compensation during the pay period to cover the deferral contribution.

The employee deferral contribution can be made using pre-tax and/or after-tax (Roth) funds.

Profit Sharing Contributions

The corporation may make profit sharing contributions for corporation’s owner(s)/employee(s) annually. Internal Revenue Code Section 401(a)(3) states that the amount of employer profit sharing contributions is limited to 25 percent of the entity’s income subject to self-employment tax.

Profit-sharing contributions must be funded by the business’s tax-filing deadline.

Please contact one of our Solo 401k Experts at 800-472-0646 for more information.

IRA Financial Group Facebook pageIRA Financial Group Twitter pageamazon-logoIRA Financial Group Tumblr pageIRA Financial Group Pinterest page

Nov 30

Are All Individual 401(k) Plans the Same?

When it comes to determining what type of 401(k) qualified retirement plan is best for a self-employed individual or small business owner with no employees, it is important to look at all the options the plan provides to make sure it will satisfy your retirement planning, tax, and investment goals.  Most financial institutions offer Solo 401(k) Plans, often called Individual 401(k) Plans. However, if you do not want to be forced to invest all your hard earn retirement savings in the stock market, then these type of financial institution Solo 401(k) Plans are not very attractive. In addition, most financial institution Solo 401(k) Plans will not offer a loan feature or allow you to make Roth Type contributions.

IRA Financial Group’s Individual 401(k) plan is unique and so popular because it is designed explicitly for small, owner-only business.  There are many features of the IRA Financial Group’s Solo 401K plan that make it so appealing for small business owners.

High Contributions: Like all Solo 401K Plans, for 2017, IRA Financial Group’s Solo 401(k) Plan will allow a plan participant to make annual contributions up to $54,000 annually with an additional $6,000 catch-up contribution for those over age 50. The high contribution feature is one of the reasons a Solo 401K Plan is the most popular retirement vehicle for the self-employed.

Calculate Your Solo 401k Plan Maximum Contribution Limit Please click here to calculate your Solo 401(k) Plan Maximum Contribution Limit.

Tax and Penalty free loan: Unlike most Solo 401K Plans offered by the traditional financial institutions such as Fidelity, IRA Financial Group’s Solo 401K Plan allows plan participants to borrow up to $50,000 or 50% of their account value (whichever is less) for any purpose, including paying credit card bills, mortgage payments, or anything else. The loan has to be paid back over a five-year period at least quarterly at a minimum prime interest rate (you have the option of selecting a higher interest rate).

Are All Individual 401(k) Plans the Same? Checkbook Control: The most attractive feature of the IRA Financial Group Solo 401k Plan is that it offers the plan participant checkbook control over his or her retirement funds. In the case of a conventional Solo 401K Plan offered by most financial institutions, the plan participant is relegated to making traditional investments such as stocks and or mutual funds. In addition, the Solo 401KPlan account is required to be opened at the financial institution. With IRA Financial Group’s Solo 401K Plan, the plan account can be opened at any local bank, including Chase, Wells Fargo, and even Fidelity. In addition, with IRA Financial Group’s Solo 401K Plan, the plan participant can make almost any traditional as well as non-traditional investments, such as real estate, precious metals, tax liens, and much more. With IRA Financial Group’s Solo 401K Plan, the Plan participant has the freedom to make the investments he or she wants while at the same time opening the 401K account at any local bank. As trustee of the Solo 401K Plan, the Plan Participant (you) can serve as the trustee providing you checkbook control over your retirement funds. With IRA Financial Group’s Solo 401K Plan, making a Solo 401K Plan investment is as simple as writing a check.

Roth Contributions & Conversion: Unlike a conventional Solo 401K Plan offered by most financial institutions, IRA Financial Group’s Solo 401K Plan contains a built in Roth sub-account which can be contributed to without any income restrictions. In addition, the IRA Financial Group’s Solo 401K Plan allows for the conversion of a traditional 401(k) or 403(b) account to a Roth subaccount. However, the Solo 401K Plan participant must pay income tax on the amount converted.

Offset the Cost of Your Plan with a Tax Deduction: By paying for your Solo 401(k) with business funds, you would be eligible to claim a deduction for the cost of the plan, including annual maintenance fees. The deduction for the cost associated with the Solo 401(k) Plan and ongoing maintenance will help reduce your business’s income tax liability, which will in-turn offset the cost of adopting a self-directed Solo 401(k) Plan. The retirement tax professionals at the IRA Financial Group will help you take advantage of the available business tax deduction for adopting a Solo 401(k) Plan.

Easy Administration: Like all Solo 401K Plans, IRA Financial Group’s Solo 401K Plan is easy to operate. There is generally no annual filing requirement unless your solo 401K Plan exceeds $250,000 in assets, in which case you will need to file a short information return with the IRS (Form 5500-EZ). However, unlike a financial institution, the tax professionals at the IRA Financial Group will assist you in completing this form is required.

To learn more about the advantages of the Solo 401K Plan with Checkbook Control please contact a 401K Expert at 800-472-0646.

IRA Financial Group Facebook pageIRA Financial Group Twitter pageamazon-logoIRA Financial Group Tumblr pageIRA Financial Group Pinterest page

Nov 17

When Are Roth Solo 401(k) Distributions Taxed?

When Are Roth Solo 401(k) Distributions Taxed?Generally, distributions from a designated Roth Solo 401(k) account are excluded from gross income if they are (1) made after the employee attains age 59 1/2 , (2) “attributable to” the employee being “disabled,” or (3) made to the employee’s beneficiary or estate after the employee’s death. However, the exclusion is denied if the distribution occurs within five years after the employee’s first designated Roth contribution to the account from which the distribution is received or, if the account contains a rollover from another designated Roth account, to the other account. Other distributions from a designated Roth account are excluded from gross income under Internal Revenue Code 72 only to the extent they consist of designated Roth contributions and are taxable to the extent they consist of trust earnings credited to the account.

Please contact one of our 401(k) Experts at 800-472-0646 for more information.

IRA Financial Group Facebook pageIRA Financial Group Twitter pageamazon-logoIRA Financial Group Tumblr pageIRA Financial Group Pinterest page

Nov 02

Learn Everything You Need to Know About a Solo 401(k) Plan

With a Solo 401(k) Plan – Make High Contributions, Borrow up to $50,000, and use your retirement funds to invest in real estate and much more tax free!

IRS Approved PlanIn 1981, the IRS formally described the rules for 401k Plans. The Solo 401(k) Plan is an IRS approved type of qualified plan. The Solo 401k plan” is not a new type of plan. It is a traditional 401k plan covering only one employee. The plans have the same rules and requirements as any other 401(k) plan. The surging interest in these Solo 401k plans is a result of the EGTRRA tax law change that became effective in 2002.

Before the Economic Growth and Tax Relief Reconciliation Act of 2001 (EGTRRA) became effective in 2002, there was no incentive for an owner-only business to establish a 401(k) plan because the business owner could generally receive the same benefits by adopting a profit sharing plan or SEP IRA. However, EGTRRA changed everything and turned the Solo 401(k) Plan into the most popular retirement plan for the self-employed. EGTRRA cleared the way for an owner-only business to defer more money into a retirement plan and to operate a more cost-effective, less complex type of plan. One of the key features of EGTRRA was that it added the employee deferral feature founded in a traditional multiple employee 401(k) Plan to the Solo 401(k) Plan. This feature turned the Solo 401(k) Plan into the retirement vehicle that provided the highest contribution benefits to the self-employed.

A Solo 401k plan is perfect for any sole proprietor, consultant, or independent contractor. A Solo 401(k) Plan offers the same abilities as a Self-Directed IRA LLC, but without having to hire a custodian or create an LLC. With the IRS approved Solo 401(k) Plan, roll over your existing IRA or 401(k) plan funds tax-free into a new Solo 401(k) Plan and use those funds to make tax-deferred investments, such as real estate, while also gaining the ability to borrow up to $50,000 as well as make annual plan contributions up to $60,000 – almost 10 times the amount of an IRA.

The Solo 401(k) Plan – The Ultimate Retirement & Investment Solution

A Solo 401(k) plan is an IRS approved retirement plan, which is suited for business owners who do not have any employees, other than themselves and perhaps their spouse. The “one-participant 401(k) plan” or individual 401(k) Plan is not a new type of plan. It is a traditional 401(k) plan covering only one employee.  Unlike a Traditional IRA, which only allows an individual to contribute $5500 annually or $6500 if the individual is over the age of 50, a Solo 401k Plan offers the Plan participant the ability to contribute up to $60,000 each year.  Before the Economic Growth and Tax Relief Reconciliation Act of 2001 (EGTRRA) became effective in 2002, there was no compelling reason for an owner-only business to establish a Solo 401(k) Plan because the business owner could generally receive the same benefits by adopting a profit sharing plan or a SEP IRA.  After 2002, EGTRRA paved the way for an owner only business to put more money aside for retirement and to operate a more cost-effective retirement plan than a Traditional IRA or 401(k) Plan.

There are a number of options that are specific to Solo 401(k) plans that make the Solo 401(k) plan a far more attractive retirement option for a self-employed individual than a Traditional IRA for a self-employed individual.

1. Maximize Your Retirement Nest Egg: A Solo 401(k) Plan includes both an employee and profit sharing contribution option, whereas, a Traditional IRA has a very low annual contribution limit.

Under the 2017 Solo 401(k) contribution rules, a plan participant under the age of 50 can make a maximum employee deferral contribution in the amount of $18,000. That amount can be made in pre-tax or after-tax (Roth). On the profit sharing side, the business can make a 25% (20% in the case of a sole proprietorship or single member LLC) profit sharing contribution up to a combined maximum, including the employee deferral, of $54,000.

For plan participants over the age of 50, an individual can make a maximum employee deferral contribution in the amount of $24,000. That amount can be made in pre-tax or after-tax (Roth). On the profit sharing side, the business can make a 25% (20% in the case of a sole proprietorship or single member LLC) profit sharing contribution up to a combined maximum, including the employee deferral, of $60,000.

Whereas, a Traditional IRA would only allow an individual with earned income during the year to contribute up to $5500, $6500 is the individual is over the age of 50.

2. Open Architecture Plan: IRA Financial Group’s Solo 401(k) Plan is an open architecture, self-directed plan that will allow you to make traditional as well as nontraditional investments, such as real estate by simply writing a check.  As trustee of the Solo 401(k) Plan, you will have “checkbook control” over your retirement assets and make the investments you want when you want.

The Solo 401k plan is unique and so popular because it is designed explicitly for small, owner only business.  The many features of the Solo 401k plan discussed above is why the Solo 401k Plan or Individual 401k Plan it so appealing and popular among self employed business owners

3. Borrow-Up to $50,000 Tax-Free: With a Solo 401K Plan you can borrow up to $50,000 or 50% of your account value, whichever is less.  The loan can be used for any purpose.  With a Traditional IRA, the IRA holder is not permitted to borrow even $1 dollar from the IRA without triggering a prohibited transaction.

It's Time To Let 401(k) Holders Invest Like the Pros 4. Buy Real Estate with Leverage Tax-Free: With a Solo 401(k) Plan, you can make a real estate investment using nonrecourse funds without triggering the Unrelated Debt Financed Income Rules and the Unrelated Business Taxable Income (UBTI or UBIT) tax (IRC 514).  However, the nonrecourse leverage exception found in IRC 514 is only applicable to 401(k) qualified retirement plans and does not apply to IRAs. In other words, using an IRA to make a real estate investment (Self Directed Real Estate IRA) involving nonrecourse financing would trigger the UBTI tax.

5. No Need to Establish an LLC:  With a Solo 401(k) Plan, the plan itself can make real estate and other investments without the need for an LLC, which depending on the state of formation could prove costly. Since a 401(k) plan is a trust, the trustee on behalf of the trust can take title to a real estate asset without the need for an LLC.

6. Strong Creditor Protection:  In general, a Solo 401(k) Plan offers greater creditor protection than a Traditional IRA.  The 2005 Bankruptcy Act generally protects all 401(k) Plan assets from creditor attack in a bankruptcy proceeding.  In addition, most states offer greater creditor protection to a Solo 401(k) qualified retirement plan than a Traditional IRA outside of bankruptcy.

7. Easy Administration: With a Solo 401(k) Plan there is no annual tax filing or information returns for any plan that has less than $250,000 in plan assets.  In the case of a Solo 401(k) Plan with greater than $250,000, a simple 2 page IRS Form 5500-EZ is required to be filed.  The tax professionals at the IRA Financial Group will help you complete the IRS Form.

8. IRS Audit Protection:  The Solo 401(k) Plan is an IRS approved qualified retirement plan.  IRA Financial Group’s Solo 401(k) Plan comes with an IRS opinion letter which confirms the validity of the plan and is a safeguard against any potential IRS audit.

9. Roth After-Tax Benefit: A Solo 401k plan can be made in pre-tax or Roth (after-tax) format.  Whereas, in the case of a Traditional IRA, contributions can only be made in pre-tax format.  In addition, a contribution of $18,000 ($24,000, if the plan participant is over the age of 50) can be made to a Solo 401(k) Roth account.

The Solo 40IK Solution

A Solo 401k Plan offers a self-employed business owner the ability to use his or her retirement funds to make almost any type of Solo 401k Planinvestment, including real estate, tax liens, private businesses, precious metals, and foreign currency on their own without requiring custodian consent tax-free! In addition, a Solo 401k Plan will allow you to make high contributions (up to $60,000) as well as borrow up to $50,000 for any purpose. Have an investment opportunity, such as real estate or a business investment that you would love to make with your 401k funds? Want the ability to make high tax-deductible or Roth contributions? Need to access up to $50,000 of your retirement funds for personal use? Then the Solo 401k Plan is your solution!

With IRA Financial Group’s Solo 401k Plan– you now can:

  • Make maximum contributions nearly 10 times higher than the IRA.
  • For 2017, contribute up to $54,000 per year or $60,000 if you are over age 50. If your spouse is involved in the business, they can contribute an additional $54,000 (or $60,000 if they are over the age of 50) per year.
  • Invest in real estate, private companies, precious metals, and virtually anything else.
  • Borrow up to $50,000 from your Solo 401k Plan for any purpose.
  • No need to hire a custodian.
  • Gain control of your retirement funds – serve as trustee of the Solo 401k Plan.
  • Make Roth contributions to your Solo 401k Plan.
  • Use non-recourse leverage to purchase real estate without penalty or tax with your Solo 401k Plan.
  • Maintain a qualified retirement plan and help save for the future.
  • Diversify your retirement portfolio with a Solo 401k Plan!
  • Access your retirement funds to make the investments you want when you want tax-free!
  • Help grow your retirement funds tax-free with a Solo 401k Plan!
  • Make investment quickly without delay with a Solo 401k!
  • Make Solo 401k Plan investment decisions without requiring custodian consent!
  • Work directly with our retirement tax professionals to establish an IRS compliant Solo 401K Plan structure that works best for you and your investment goals.

Our Solo 401k Plan Establishment Service Includes:

  • Solo 401k Adoption Agreement
  • Solo 401k Basic Plan Document
  • EGTRRA Amendment
  • Solo 401k Summary Plan Description
  • Trust Agreement
  • Appointment of Trustee
  • Action by Board of Directors
  • Beneficiary Designation
  • Solo 401k Loan Procedure
  • Solo 401k Loan Documentation
  • Election Not To Participate
  • Transfer Request Forms for incoming funds transfers
  • Newly assigned Employer Identification Number from the IRS
  • IRS Determination letter stating that this is a Prototype Plan that meets the requirements of a qualified plan
  • Free tax and ERISA support on the Solo 401k Plan structure
  • Direct access to our on-site retirement tax professionals
  • Satisfaction Guaranteed!

We have developed a process that ensures speed and compliance, by using standardized procedures that work via phone, e-mail, fax, and mail. Your funds will be ready for investment into your new Solo 401k Plan within 24 hours.

Why Work With the IRA Financial Group?

The IRA Financial Group was founded by a group of top law firm tax and ERISA lawyers who have worked at some of the largest law firms in the United States, such as White & Case LLP, Dewey & LeBoeuf LLP, and Thelen LLP. Over the years, we have helped thousands of clients establish self-directed Solo 401(k) Plans. With our work experience at some of the largest law firms in the country, our retirement tax professionals’ tax and ERISA knowledge in this area is unmatched.

To learn more about the advantages of using a Solo 401(k) Plan, please contact one of our Solo 401(k) Plan experts at 800-472-0646 for more information.

You can use Solo 401(k) Plan funds to invest in a friend's business.

The Solo 401k Plan offers a self-employed business owner the ability to use his or her retirement funds to make almost any type of investment, including real estate, tax liens, private businesses, precious metals, and foreign currency, on their own without requiring custodian consent and tax-free! For more information on the Solo 401k Plan, check out the books by IRA Financial Group’s Adam Bergman entitled “Going Solo – America’s Best-Kept Retirement Secret For The Self-Employed” and “Solo 401(k) In A Nutshell” available on Amazon.

IRA Financial Group Facebook pageIRA Financial Group Twitter pageamazon-logoIRA Financial Group Tumblr pageIRA Financial Group Pinterest page

Oct 23

IRS Announces 2018 Solo 401(k) Contribution Limits

Under the 2018 Solo 401(k) contribution rules, a plan participant under the age of 50 can make a maximum annual employee deferral contribution in the amount of $18,500. That amount can be made in pre-tax, after-tax or Roth. On the profit sharing side, the business can make a 25% (20% in the case of a sole proprietorship or single member LLC) annual profit sharing contribution up to a combined maximum, including the employee deferral, of $55,000, an increase of $1,000 from 2017.

IRS Announces 2018 Solo 401(k) Contribution LimitsFor plan participants over the age of 50, an individual can make a maximum annual employee deferral contribution in the amount of $24,500. That amount can be made in pre-tax, after tax, or Roth. On the profit sharing side, the business can make a 25% (20% in the case of a sole proprietorship or single member LLC) annual profit sharing contribution up to a combined maximum, including the employee deferral, of $61,000, an increase of $1,000 from 2017.

One of the main benefits of a Solo 401(k) Plan is the opportunity to make higher annual contributions in pre-tax, after-tax or Roth.

IRA Financial Group’s Solo 401(k) plan is unique and so popular because it is designed explicitly for small, owner-only business. In addition, to the high annual contribution limitations. There are many features of the IRA Financial Group’s Solo 401(k) plan that make it so appealing for small business owners.

Tax and Penalty Free Loan

Unlike most Solo 401(k) Plans offered by the traditional financial institutions such as Fidelity, IRA Financial Group’s Solo 401(k) Plan allows plan participants to borrow up to $50,000 or 50% of their account value (whichever is less) for any purpose, including paying credit card bills, mortgage payments, or anything else. The loan has to be paid back over a five-year period at least quarterly at a minimum prime interest rate (you have the option of selecting a higher interest rate).

Checkbook Control & No Transaction Fees

The most attractive feature of the IRA Financial Group Solo 401(k) Plan is that it offers the plan participant checkbook control over his or her retirement funds. In the case of a conventional Solo 401(k) Plan offered by most financial institutions, the plan participant is relegated to making traditional investments, such as stocks and or mutual funds. In addition, the Solo 401(k) Plan account is required to be opened at the financial institution. With IRA Financial Group’s Solo 401(k) Plan, the plan account can be opened at any local bank, including Chase, Wells Fargo, and even Fidelity. In addition, with IRA Financial Group’s Solo 401(k) Plan, the plan participant can make almost any traditional as well as non-traditional investments, such as real estate, precious metals, tax liens, and much more. With IRA Financial Group’s Solo 401(k) Plan, the Plan participant has the freedom to make the investments he or she wants while at the same time opening the 401(k) account at any local bank. As trustee of the Solo 401(k) Plan, the Plan Participant (you) can serve as the trustee providing you checkbook control over your retirement funds. With IRA Financial Group’s Solo 401(k) Plan, making a Solo 401(k) Plan investment is as simple as writing a check.

Invest in Real Estate & Much More Tax-Free

With IRA Financial Group’s Self-Directed Solo 401(k) plan, you will be able to invest in almost any type of investment opportunity that you discover, including: real estate, tax liens, precious metals, private notes, hard money loans, private business, etc.; your only limit is your imagination. The income and gains from these investments will flow back into your Solo 401(k) tax-free.

Roth Contributions & Conversion

Unlike a conventional Solo 401(k) Plan offered by most financial institutions, IRA Financial Group’s Solo 401(k) Plan contains a built in Roth sub-account which can be contributed to without any income restrictions. In addition, the IRA Financial Group’s Solo 401(k) Plan allows for the conversion of a traditional 401(k) or 403(b) account to a Roth subaccount. However, the Solo 401(k) Plan participant must pay income tax on the amount converted.

Easy Administration

IRA Financial Group’s Solo 401(k) Plan is easy to operate. There is generally no annual filing requirement unless your solo 401(k) Plan exceeds $250,000 in assets, in which case you will need to file a short information return with the IRS (Form 5500-EZ). However, unlike a financial institution, the tax professionals at the IRA Financial Group will assist you in completing this form, if it is required.

To learn more about the advantages of the Solo 401K Plan with Checkbook Control please contact a 401(k) Expert at 800-472-0646.

IRA Financial Group Facebook pageIRA Financial Group Twitter pageamazon-logoIRA Financial Group Tumblr pageIRA Financial Group Pinterest page

Oct 18

Choosing a Solo 401(k) Over a SEP IRA

A Solo 401(k) Plan is an IRS approved retirement plan, which is suited for business owners who do not have any employees, other than themselves and perhaps their spouse. The “one-participant 401(k) Plan” or Individual 401(k) Plan is not a new type of plan. It is a traditional 401(k) Plan covering only one employee.  Like a SEP IRA, a Solo 401(k) Plan offers the plan participant the ability to contribute up to $60,000 each year.  Before the Economic Growth and Tax Relief Reconciliation Act of 2001 (EGTRRA) became effective in 2002, there was no compelling reason for an owner-only business to establish a Solo 401(k) Plan because the business owner could generally receive the same benefits by adopting a profit sharing plan or a SEP IRA.  After 2002, EGTRRA paved the way for an owner-only business to put more money aside for retirement and to operate a more cost-effective retirement plan than a SEP IRA or 401(k) Plan.

There are a number of options that are specific to Solo 401(k) Plans that make the Solo 401(k) Plan a far more attractive retirement option for a self-employed individual than a SEP IRA.

1. Reach your Maximum Contribution Amount Quicker: A Solo 401(k) Plan includes both an employee and profit sharing contribution option, whereas, a SEP IRA is purely a profit sharing plan.

Under the 2017 Solo 401(k) contribution rules, a plan participant under the age of 50 can make a maximum employee deferral contribution in the amount of $18,000. That amount can be made in pre-tax or after-tax (Roth). On the profit sharing side, the business can make a 25% (20% in the case of a sole proprietorship or single member LLC) profit sharing contribution up to a combined maximum, including the employee deferral, of $54,000.

For plan participants over the age of 50, an individual can make a maximum employee deferral contribution in the amount of $24,000. That amount can be made in pre-tax or after-tax (Roth). On the profit sharing side, the business can make a 25% (20% in the case of a sole proprietorship or single member LLC) profit sharing contribution up to a combined maximum, including the employee deferral, of $60,000.

Whereas, a SEP IRA would only allows for a profit sharing contribution.  Hence, a participant in a SEP IRA would be limited to 25% (20% in the case of a sole proprietorship or single member LLC) profit sharing contribution up to a combined maximum of $54,000 for 2017. No employee deferral exists for a SEP IRA.

For example, Joe, who is 60 years old, owns 100% of an S Corporation with no full time employees.  Joe earned $100,000 in self-employment W-2 wages for 2017.  If Joe had a Solo 401(k) Plan established for 2017, Joe would be able to defer approximately $49,000 for 2017 (a $24,000 employee deferral, which could be pre-tax or Roth, and 25% of his compensation giving him $49,000 for the year).   Whereas, if Joe established a SEP IRA, Joe would only be able to defer approximately $25,000 (25% if his compensation) for 2017.

2. No catch-up Contributions: With a Solo 401(k) Plan you can make a contribution of up to $54,000 to the plan each tax year ($60,000 if the participant is over the age of 50).  However, with a SEP IRA, the maximum amount that can be deferred is $54,000 since a SEP IRA does not offer any catch-up contributions.

3. No Roth Feature: A Solo 401(k) plan can be made in pre-tax or Roth (after-tax) format.  Whereas, in the case of a SEP IRA, contributions can only be made in pre-tax format.  In addition, a contribution of $18,000 ($24,00, if the plan participant is over the age of 50) can be made to a Solo 401(k) Roth account.

4. Tax-Free Loan Option: With a Solo 401(k) Plan you can borrow up to $50,000 or 50% of your account value, whichever is less.  The loan can be used for any purpose.  With a SEP IRA, the IRA holder is not permitted to borrow even $1 dollar from the IRA without triggering a prohibited transaction.

5. Use Nonrecourse Leverage and Pay No Tax: With a Solo 401(k) Plan, you can make a real estate investment using nonrecourse funds without triggering the Unrelated Debt Financed Income Rules and the Unrelated Business Taxable Income (UBTI or UBIT) tax (IRC 514).  However, the nonrecourse leverage exception found in IRC 514 is only applicable to 401(k) qualified retirement plans and does not apply to IRAs. In other words, using a Self-Directed SEP IRA to make a real estate investment (Self-Directed Real Estate IRA) involving nonrecourse financing would trigger the UBTI tax.

6. Open the Account at Any Local Bank: With a Solo 401(k) Plan, the 401(k) bank account can be opened at any local bank or trust company.  However, in the case of a SEP or a Self-Directed IRA, a special IRA custodian is required to hold the IRA funds.

7. No Need for the Cost of an LLC: With a Solo 401(k) Plan, the plan itself can make real estate and other investments without the need for an LLC, which, depending on the state of formation, could prove costly. Since a 401(k) plan is a trust, the trustee on behalf of the trust can take title to a real estate asset without the need for an LLC.

8. Better Creditor Protection: In general, a Solo 401(k) Plan offers greater creditor protection than a SEP IRA.  The 2005 Bankruptcy Act generally protects all 401(k) Plan assets from creditor attack in a bankruptcy proceeding.  In addition, most states offer greater creditor protection to a Solo 401(k) qualified retirement plan than a SEP IRA outside of bankruptcy.

The Solo 401k plan is unique and so popular because it is designed explicitly for small, owner-only businesses.  The many features of the Solo 401(k) plan discussed above are why the Solo 401(k) Plan or Individual 401(k) Plan is so appealing and popular among self-employed business owners.

To learn more about the benefits of a Solo 401(k) Plan vs. a SEP IRA, please contact a tax professional at 800-472-0646.

IRA Financial Group Facebook pageIRA Financial Group Twitter pageamazon-logoIRA Financial Group Tumblr pageIRA Financial Group Pinterest page

Oct 10

Self-Directing Your Solo 401(k) is Easy!

A Solo 401K Plan, also called a Self-Directed 401K, offers a self employed business owner the ability to use their retirement funds to make almost any type of investment tax-free, including real estate, on their own without requiring custodian consent. Additionally, a Self-Directed 401K Plan will allow you to make high contributions to the Plan (up to $54,000 for plan participants under the age of 50 and $60,000 for plan participants over the age of 50) as well as borrow up to $50,000 for any purpose.

Advantages of Using a Self-Directed 401K

The Self-Directed Solo 401K Plan is such a popular retirement solution for small business owners because the IRS designed it specifically for them. Unlike other 401(k) Plans, which restrict plan investments to just stocks and mutual funds, IRA Financial Group’s Self-Directed 401K Plan is designed specifically to allow plan participants to diversify their retirement portfolio by making traditional as well as non-traditional investments such as real estate and precious metals. The Individual 401K Plan can be adopted by a sole proprietorship, LLC, Partnership, or Corporation.

There are a number of features that make the Self-Directed 401K Plan so appealing and popular among self -employed business owners.

High Contribution Limits: Under the 2017 Solo 401(k) contribution rules, a plan participant under the age of 50 can make a maximum employee deferral contribution in the amount of $18,000. That amount can be made in pre-tax or after-tax (Roth). On the profit sharing side, the business can make a 25% (20% in the case of a sole proprietorship or single member LLC) profit sharing contribution up to a combined maximum, including the employee deferral, of $54,000.

For plan participants over the age of 50, an individual can make a maximum employee deferral contribution in the amount of $24,000. That amount can be made in pre-tax or after-tax (Roth). On the profit sharing side, the business can make a 25% (20% in the case of a sole proprietorship or single member LLC) profit sharing contribution up to a combined maximum, including the employee deferral, of $60,000.

Calculate Your Solo 401k Plan Maximum Contribution Limit Please click here to calculate your Solo 401(k) Plan Maximum Contribution Limit.

Tax-Free Loan:   With a Self-Directed 401K Plan, a plan participant is eligible to borrow up to $50,000 or 50% of their account value (whichever is less) for any purpose, including paying personal expenses such as credit card bills, mortgage payments, personal or business investments, a car, vacation, or anything else. The loan has to be paid back over a five-year period at least quarterly at a minimum prime interest rate (you have the option of selecting a higher interest rate). There is no pre-payment penalty.

Checkbook Control”: One of the most popular aspects of the Self-Directed 401K Plan is that it does not require the participant to hire a bank or trust company to serve as trustee. Unlike, an IRA which requires a financial institution to serve as trustee and custodian of the IRA, in the case of a Self-Directed 401K Plan, the plan account can be opened at any local bank or credit union and the plan participant can serve as trustee of the Self-Directed 401K. This flexibility allows the plan participant (you) to gain “checkbook control” over your retirement funds. In essence, all assets of the Self-Directed 401K Plan will be under the sole authority of the 401k participant.  A Self-Directed 401K plan allows you to eliminate the expense and delays associated with an IRA custodian, enabling you to act quickly when the right investment opportunity presents itself. With a Self-Directed 401K Plan, making a 401K Plan investment is as simple as writing a check.

A World of Investment Opportunity: With a Self-Directed 401K, you will be able to invest in almost any type of investment opportunity that you discover, including: Real Estate (rentals, foreclosures, raw land, tax liens etc.), Private Businesses, Precious Metals, Hard Money & Peer to Peer Lending as well as stock and mutual funds; you’re only limit is your imagination. The income and gains from these investments will flow back into your Self-Directed 401K Plan tax-free!

Self-Directed 401KUse Leverage Tax-Free:   When an IRA buys real estate that is leveraged with nonrecourse mortgage financing, it creates Unrelated Debt Financed Income (a type of Unrelated Business Taxable Income) on which taxes must be paid pursuant to Internal Revenue Code Section 514. A Self-Directed 401K plan is generally exempt from UDFI. What this means is that unlike an IRA, Internal Revenue Code Section 514(c)(9), allows a Self-Directed 401K plan to use nonrecourse leverage to make a real estate acquisition without tax or penalty.

Roth Contributions: The Self-Directed 401K Plan contains a built in Roth sub-account which can be contributed to without any income restrictions. A Self-Directed 401K Plan will allow you to make pre-tax and/or after-tax (Roth) employee deferral contributions to your Plan.

Easy Administration:  The Self-Directed 401K Plan is easy to operate and effortless to administer. There is generally no annual filing requirement unless the assets in your Self-Directed 401K Plan exceeds $250,000, in which case you will need to file a short information return with the IRS (Form 5500-EZ).

Roth Conversion: The Self-Directed 401K Plans allows for the conversion of pre-tax 401K funds to an after-tax Roth sub-account. However, the 401K Plan participant must pay income tax on the amount converted.

Offset the Cost of Your Plan with a Tax Deduction: By paying for your Solo 401(k) with business funds, you would be eligible to claim a deduction for the cost of the plan, including annual maintenance fees. The deduction for the cost associated with the Solo 401(k) Plan and ongoing maintenance will help reduce your business’s income tax liability, which will in-turn offset the cost of adopting a self-directed Solo 401(k) Plan. The retirement tax professionals at the IRA Financial Group will help you take advantage of the available business tax deduction for adopting a Solo 401(k) Plan.

Asset & Creditor Protection: In the case of a bankruptcy, the general exemption found in section 522 of the Bankruptcy Code, 11 U.S.C. §522, provides an unlimited exemption for retirement assets exempt from taxation for Section 401(a) (tax qualified retirement plans—pensions, profit-sharing and section 401(k) plans). Thus, ERISA qualified plans as well as Self-Directed 401K plans are afforded full bankruptcy exemption. Outside of bankruptcy, state law will govern whether Self-Directed Solo 401K Plan assets are protected from creditors. Most states will provide protection for Self-Directed Solo 401K Plan assets from creditors outside of the bankruptcy context.

IRA Financial Group will take care of setting up your entire Self-Directed 401K Plan. The whole process can be handled by phone, email, fax, or mail and typically takes between 2-10 days to complete, the timing largely depending on the time it takes your current retirement asset custodian to move the funds to the new Self-Directed 401K Plan account. Our tax and ERISA professionals are on-site greatly reducing the set-up time and cost. Most importantly, each client of the IRA Financial Group is assigned a retirement tax professional to help with the establishment of the Self-Directed 401K Plan.

For additional information on the Self-Directed 401(k) Plan, please contact us at 800-472-0646.

IRA Financial Group Facebook pageIRA Financial Group Twitter pageamazon-logoIRA Financial Group Tumblr pageIRA Financial Group Pinterest page

Oct 02

Non-Deductible Solo 401(k) Contribution Strategy

The Secret Way to Boost Your Annual 401(k) Plan Contributions

In the case of an IRA, most people know that IRA contributions can be made in pre-tax, after-tax, or Roth. However, it is not widely known that a Solo 401(k) plan can allow you to make non-deductible plan contributions based off your income on a dollar for dollar basis.

Types of Plan Contributions

A contribution to a pre-tax 401(k) plan is a tax-deductible contribution; however, it is subject to tax when distributed. Unlike pre-tax elective contributions, a Roth 401(k) plan contribution is an after-tax contribution that is currently includible in gross income but generally tax-free when distributed. Whereas, when after-tax plan contributions are made from an employee’s compensation (other than Roth contributions), then an employee must include it as income on his or her tax return.

Non-Deductible 401(k) Plan Contribution Tax Strategy

Non-Deductible Solo 401(k) Contribution StrategyGenerally, when an individual is over the age of 50, he or she is able to make employee deferrals in a pre-tax fund or Roth of up to $18,000 or $24,000. A profit sharing contribution can be made in pre-tax funds in the amount equal to 25% of compensation (20% in case of self-employment or a single member LLC), and both contributions cannot exceed $54,000 or $60,000 in the aggregate for 2017. An after-tax deferral, (neither Roth or pre-tax), is also an option that can go up to $54,000 or $60,000 and include other plan contributions such as employee deferrals and profit sharing. For example, if a 40-year-old self-employed individual earns $100,000 in 2017, he or she would be able to make a maximum employee deferral contribution of $18,000 in pre-tax funds or Roth and make an after-tax contribution dollar-for dollar equal to $36,000. This is the difference between $54,000 (the maximum annual 401(k) contribution for 2017) and $18,000, the maximum employee deferral contributions limit. Those contributions can then be converted to a Roth. The advantage of making after-tax contributions versus a profit sharing contribution is that you can make a dollar for dollar contribution as opposed to a profit sharing contribution, which is based off a percentage of your compensation (20% or 25%). If a profit sharing contribution were made instead of an after-tax contribution, the individual would only be able to make a $20,000 contribution, giving him or her an annual contribution of just $38,000 versus $54,000 if employee deferrals were combined with after-tax contributions.

Is the Nondeductible 401(k) Contribution Option New?

No, Non-deductible 401(k) plan contributions are not new, but new IRS regulations (Notice 2014-54) make after-tax contributions more appealing and allows the retiree to effectively segregate the after-tax assets from the pre-tax funds. The pre-tax funds can be rolled into a Traditional IRA, whereas the after-tax dollars can be converted into a Roth IRA.

Do All Solo 401(k) Plans Allow for Non-Deductible contributions?

No. You must check the 401(k) plan documents to confirm that the plan allows for non-deductible contributions. IRA Financial Group’s Solo 401(k) Plan allows for non-deductible contributions, in addition to pre-tax and Roth contributions.

For additional information on making non-deductible contributions to a Solo 401(k) plan, please contact one of our Solo 401(k) plan experts at 800-472-0646.

IRA Financial Group Facebook pageIRA Financial Group Twitter pageamazon-logoIRA Financial Group Tumblr pageIRA Financial Group Pinterest page

Aug 24

What Can You Invest in With a Self-Directed Solo 401(k)?

A Solo 401(k) Plan offers one the ability to use his or her retirement funds to make almost any type of investment on their own without requiring the consent of any custodian or person. The IRS and Department of Labor only describe the types of investments that are prohibited, which are very few.

The following are some examples of types of investments that can be made with your Solo 401(k) Plan:

  • Residential or commercial real estate
  • Domestic of foreign real estate
  • Raw land
  • Foreclosure property
  • Mortgages
  • Mortgage pools
  • Deeds
  • Private loans
  • Tax liens
  • Private businesses
  • Limited Liability Companies
  • Limited Liability Partnerships
  • Private placements
  • Precious metals and certain coins
  • Stocks, bonds, mutual funds
  • Foreign currencies

Solo 401(k) Flow Chart

Real Estate

The IRS permits using a Solo 401(k) to purchase real estate or raw land. Since you are the trustee of the 401(k) Plan, making a real estate investment is as simple as writing a check from your 401(k) Plan bank account. The advantage of purchasing real estate with your Solo 401(k) Plan is that all gains are tax-deferred until a distribution is taken (pre-tax 401(k) distributions are not required until the Plan Participant turns 70 1/2). In the case of a Roth Solo 401(k) Plan, all gains are tax-free.

Solo 401(k) Investments For example, if you purchased a piece of property with your Solo 401(k) Plan for $100,000 and you later sold the property for $300,000, the $200,000 of gain appreciation would generally be tax-free. Whereas, if you purchased the property using personal funds (non-retirement funds), the gain would be subject to federal income tax and in most cases state income tax.

Tax Liens

The IRS permits the purchase of tax liens and tax deeds with a Solo 401(k) Plan. By using a Solo 401(k) Plan to purchase tax-liens or tax deeds, your profits are tax-deferred back into your retirement account until a distribution is taken (pre-tax 401(k) distributions are not required until the Plan Participant turns 70 1/2). In the case of a Roth Solo 401(k) Plan, all gains are tax-free.

More importantly, with a Solo 401(k) Plan, you, as trustee of the 401(k) Plan, will have “checkbook control” over your retirement funds allowing you to make purchases on the spot without custodian consent. In other words, purchasing a tax-lien or tax deed is as easy as writing a check!

Loans & Notes

The IRS permits using 401(k) funds to make loans or purchase notes from third parties. By using a Solo 401(k) Plan to make loans or purchase notes from third-parties, all interest payments received would be tax-deferred until a distribution is taken (pre-tax 401(k) distributions are not required until the Plan Participant turns 70 1/2). In the case of a Roth Solo 401(k) Plan, all gains are tax-free.

For example, if you used a Solo 401(k) to loan money to a friend, all interest received would flow back into your 401(k) Plan tax-free. Whereas, if you lent your friend money from personal funds (non-retirement funds), the interest received would be subject to federal and in most cases state income tax.

Private Businesses

With a Solo 401(k) you are permitted to purchase an interest in a privately held business. The business can be established as any entity other than an S Corporation (i.e. limited liability company, C Corporation, partnership, etc.). When investing in a private business using 401(k) funds, it is important to keep in mind the “Disqualified Person” and “Prohibited Transaction” rules under IRC 4975 and the Unrelated Business Taxable Income rules under IRC 512. The retirement tax professionals at the IRA Financial Group will work with you to develop the most tax-efficient structure for using your Solo 401(k) Plan to invest in a private business.

Precious Metals & Coins

Our Solo 401(k) Plan documents allow for investments into IRS approved precious metals and coins (bullion), as defined in Internal Revenue Code Section 4975. The advantage of using a Solo 401(k) Plan to purchase precious metals and/or coins is that their values generally keep up with, or exceed, inflation rates better than other investments. In addition, the IRS approved precious metals and/or coin (bullion) should be held at an approved depository or U.S. Bank, as defined under Internal Revenue Code Section 408(a).

Foreign Currencies

The IRS does not prevent the use of 401(k) funds to purchase foreign currencies, including Iraqi Dinars. In fact, our Solo 401(k) Plan documents permit the purchase of foreign currencies. Many believe that foreign currency investments offer liquidity advantages to the stock market as well as significant investment opportunities.

By using a Solo 401(k) to purchase foreign currencies, such as the Iraqi Dinar, all foreign currency gains generated would be tax-deferred until a distribution is taken (pre-tax 401(k) distributions are not required until the Plan Participant turns 70 1/2). In the case of a Roth Solo 401(k) Plan, all gains are tax-free.

Stocks, Bonds, Mutual Funds, CDs

In addition to non-traditional investments such as real estate, a Solo 401(k) may purchase stock, bonds, mutual funds, and CDs. The advantage of using a Solo 401(k) Plan with “Checkbook Control” is that you are not limited to just making these types of investments. With a Solo 401(k) Plan with “checkbook control” you can open a stock trading account with any financial institution as well as purchase real estate, buy tax liens, or lend money to a third-party. Your investment opportunities are endless!

For additional information on the advantages of using a Solo 401K Plan to make investments, please contact one of our 401(k) Experts at 800-472-0646.

IRA Financial Group Facebook pageIRA Financial Group Twitter pageamazon-logoIRA Financial Group Tumblr pageIRA Financial Group Pinterest page