Nov 30

Are All Individual 401(k) Plans the Same?

When it comes to determining what type of 401(k) qualified retirement plan is best for a self-employed individual or small business owner with no employees, it is important to look at all the options the plan provides to make sure it will satisfy your retirement planning, tax, and investment goals.  Most financial institutions offer Solo 401(k) Plans, often called Individual 401(k) Plans. However, if you do not want to be forced to invest all your hard earn retirement savings in the stock market, then these type of financial institution Solo 401(k) Plans are not very attractive. In addition, most financial institution Solo 401(k) Plans will not offer a loan feature or allow you to make Roth Type contributions.

IRA Financial Group’s Individual 401(k) plan is unique and so popular because it is designed explicitly for small, owner-only business.  There are many features of the IRA Financial Group’s Solo 401K plan that make it so appealing for small business owners.

High Contributions: Like all Solo 401K Plans, for 2017, IRA Financial Group’s Solo 401(k) Plan will allow a plan participant to make annual contributions up to $54,000 annually with an additional $6,000 catch-up contribution for those over age 50. The high contribution feature is one of the reasons a Solo 401K Plan is the most popular retirement vehicle for the self-employed.

Calculate Your Solo 401k Plan Maximum Contribution Limit Please click here to calculate your Solo 401(k) Plan Maximum Contribution Limit.

Tax and Penalty free loan: Unlike most Solo 401K Plans offered by the traditional financial institutions such as Fidelity, IRA Financial Group’s Solo 401K Plan allows plan participants to borrow up to $50,000 or 50% of their account value (whichever is less) for any purpose, including paying credit card bills, mortgage payments, or anything else. The loan has to be paid back over a five-year period at least quarterly at a minimum prime interest rate (you have the option of selecting a higher interest rate).

Are All Individual 401(k) Plans the Same? Checkbook Control: The most attractive feature of the IRA Financial Group Solo 401k Plan is that it offers the plan participant checkbook control over his or her retirement funds. In the case of a conventional Solo 401K Plan offered by most financial institutions, the plan participant is relegated to making traditional investments such as stocks and or mutual funds. In addition, the Solo 401KPlan account is required to be opened at the financial institution. With IRA Financial Group’s Solo 401K Plan, the plan account can be opened at any local bank, including Chase, Wells Fargo, and even Fidelity. In addition, with IRA Financial Group’s Solo 401K Plan, the plan participant can make almost any traditional as well as non-traditional investments, such as real estate, precious metals, tax liens, and much more. With IRA Financial Group’s Solo 401K Plan, the Plan participant has the freedom to make the investments he or she wants while at the same time opening the 401K account at any local bank. As trustee of the Solo 401K Plan, the Plan Participant (you) can serve as the trustee providing you checkbook control over your retirement funds. With IRA Financial Group’s Solo 401K Plan, making a Solo 401K Plan investment is as simple as writing a check.

Roth Contributions & Conversion: Unlike a conventional Solo 401K Plan offered by most financial institutions, IRA Financial Group’s Solo 401K Plan contains a built in Roth sub-account which can be contributed to without any income restrictions. In addition, the IRA Financial Group’s Solo 401K Plan allows for the conversion of a traditional 401(k) or 403(b) account to a Roth subaccount. However, the Solo 401K Plan participant must pay income tax on the amount converted.

Offset the Cost of Your Plan with a Tax Deduction: By paying for your Solo 401(k) with business funds, you would be eligible to claim a deduction for the cost of the plan, including annual maintenance fees. The deduction for the cost associated with the Solo 401(k) Plan and ongoing maintenance will help reduce your business’s income tax liability, which will in-turn offset the cost of adopting a self-directed Solo 401(k) Plan. The retirement tax professionals at the IRA Financial Group will help you take advantage of the available business tax deduction for adopting a Solo 401(k) Plan.

Easy Administration: Like all Solo 401K Plans, IRA Financial Group’s Solo 401K Plan is easy to operate. There is generally no annual filing requirement unless your solo 401K Plan exceeds $250,000 in assets, in which case you will need to file a short information return with the IRS (Form 5500-EZ). However, unlike a financial institution, the tax professionals at the IRA Financial Group will assist you in completing this form is required.

To learn more about the advantages of the Solo 401K Plan with Checkbook Control please contact a 401K Expert at 800-472-0646.

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Nov 10

Advantages of a Checkbook Control Individual 401(k) Plan

An Individual 401(k) plan, also known as a Solo 401(k), is perfect for sole proprietors, small businesses and independent contractors.

A Solo 401(k) plan is generally also referred to as a “checkbook control” Qualified Retirement Plan. In each case, a 401(k) plan is established whereby the participant serves as trustee and administrator of the Plan providing the participant with “checkbook control” over his or her retirement funds.

Advantages of a Checkbook Control Individual 401(k) PlanWith a “checkbook control” Solo 401(K) Plan you will never have to seek the consent of a custodian to make an investment or be subject to excessive custodian account fees based on account value and per transaction.

By having “checkbook control” over your retirement funds you will gain the following advantages:

“Checkbook Control”: You’ll no longer have to get each investment approved by the custodian of your account. Instead, all decisions are truly yours. To make an investment, simply write a check and use the funds straight from your Solo 401(k) Plan bank account.

When making a real estate investment or purchasing tax liens, a “checkbook control” Solo 401(k) Plan, will allow you as manager of the LLC the ability to simply write a check from your Solo 401(k) Plan bank account.

Example 1: Joe has a Solo 401(k) set-up by the IRA Financial Group. Joe has established his Solo 401(k) Plan bank account with Bank of America. Joe wishes to use his retirement funds to purchase a home from Steve, an unrelated third-party (non-disqualified person). Steve is anxious to close the transaction as soon as possible. With a “checkbook control” Solo 401(k) Plan, Joe can simply write a check using the funds from his 401(k) Plan bank account or can wire the funds directly from the account to Steve. Joe, as trustee of the plan, no longer needs to seek the consent of the custodian before making the real estate purchase. With a custodian controlled Solo 401(k) Plan without “checkbook control” Joe may not be able to make the real estate purchase since seeking custodian approval would likely take too much time.

Example 2: Joe has a Solo 401(k) set-up by the IRA Financial Group. Joe has established his Solo 401(k) Plan bank account with Bank of America. Joe wishes to use his retirement funds to invest in tax lien certificates via auction. Purchasing tax lien certificates requires Joe make the payment at the auction. With a “checkbook control” Solo 401(k) Plan, Joe can simply bring his 401(k) Plan bank account checkbook to the closing or secure a certified check from the bank in order to make payments at the auction. With a custodian controlled Solo 401(k) Plan without “checkbook control” Joe would not be able to make tax lien certificate investments because he would need custodian approval before each tax lien certificate purchase and would not have sufficient time to seek the consent of the custodian.

No Custodian Fees or Transaction Fees: The most significant cost benefit of the Solo 401(k) plan is that it does not require the participant to hire a bank or trust company to serve as trustee. In other words, there are no custodian fees or transaction fees when establishing a Solo 401(k) Plan with the IRA Financial Group. This flexibility allows the participant to serve in the trustee role. This means that all assets of the 401(k) trust are under the sole authority of the Solo 401k participant.  A Solo 401(k) plan allows you to eliminate the expense and delays associated with an IRA custodian, enabling you to act quickly when the right investment opportunity presents itself.

Speed: You can act quickly on a great investment opportunity. When you find an investment that you want to make with your retirement funds, simply write a check or wire the funds straight from your Solo 401(k) Plan bank account to make the investment. The Solo 401(k) Plan allows you to eliminate the delays associated with using an IRA custodian, enabling you to act quickly when the right investment opportunity presents itself.

Offset the Cost of Your Plan with a Tax Deduction: By paying for your Solo 401(k) with business funds, you would be eligible to claim a deduction for the cost of the plan, including annual maintenance fees. The deduction for the cost associated with the Solo 401(k) Plan and ongoing maintenance will help reduce your business’s income tax liability, which will in-turn offset the cost of adopting a self-directed Solo 401(k) Plan. The retirement tax professionals at the IRA Financial Group will help you take advantage of the available business tax deduction for adopting a Solo 401(k) Plan.

Cost Effective Administration: In general, the solo 401(k) plan is easy to operate. There is generally no annual filing requirement unless your Solo 401K plan exceeds $250,000 in assets, in which case you will need to file a short information return with the IRS (Form 5500-EZ).

Solo 401k Solution

For more information about the Individual 401(k) with checkbook control, please contact us @ 800.472.0646.

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Sep 06

Why Choose IRA Financial Group for Your Individual 401(k) Plan?

An IRA Financial Group Individual 401(k), also known as a Solo 401(k), offers lots of benefits.  Here are just a few –

Excellence: Our in-house retirement tax professionals have worked at some of the largest law firms in the United States, including White & Case LLP and Dewey & LeBoeuf LLP. Their tax and ERISA experience is unmatched in the industry and is the reason we are considered the leading facilitator of true “Checkbook Control” Solo 401(k) Plan structures.

Why Choose IRA Financial Group for Your Individual 401(k) Plan?Work directly with our in-house retirement tax professionals to set-up an IRS compliant Solo 401K Plan. Our clients have direct access to our in-house retirement tax professionals to ensure that the Solo 401K Plan is customized to satisfy the client’s retirement and investment objectives. In fact, we encourage our clients to contact our in-house retirement tax professionals with any tax and ERISA questions concerning the structure or a proposed investment to ensure full IRS compliance.

Our Solo 401K experts will take care of the entire set-up of your IRS compliant Solo 401k Plan. Our Solo 401k Plan experts and tax and ERISA professionals are on site greatly reducing the set-up time and cost. You will find that our fee for this service is significantly less than other companies that perform the same or similar services.

Leader: IRA Financial Group is the markets leading provider of Solo 401(k) Plans. We have helped thousands of clients take back control over their retirement funds while gaining the ability to invest in almost any type of investments.

Value: We strive to offer our clients customized Solo 401(k) Plans at a fair and reasonable price. Whereas our competitors are forced to outsource much or all of their tax work and consultation, each client of the IRA Financial Group is assigned to one of our in-house retirement tax professionals allowing us to offer customized Solo 401(k) Plans for significantly less than our competitors.

We provide the following all for one low price:

  • Free tax consultation with our in-house tax and ERISA professionals
  • Adoption Agreement
  • Basic Plan Document
  • EGTRRA Amendment
  • Summary Plan Description
  • Trust Agreement
  • Appointment of Trustee
  • Beneficiary Designation
  • Loan Procedure
  • Loan Promissory Note
  • Free tax updates
  • Free tax and ERISA support
  • Satisfaction Guaranteed!

Integrity: We are guided by the rules of ethical conduct in all that we do. Our relationships with clients are built on trust, respect, and confidentiality.

Innovative: We anticipate the changing tax and financial needs of our clients and creatively adapt our Solo 401(k) Plan tax solutions to address them.

Results: We are committed to our clients’ satisfaction and strive to meet and exceed our clients’ expectations.

IRA Financial Group will take care of everything. The whole process can be handled by phone, email, fax, or mail. Our expert tax and ERISA professionals are on site greatly reducing the set-up time and cost. Most importantly, you will find that our fee for this service is significantly less than other companies that perform the same or similar services.

Please contact one of our 401(k) Experts at 800-472-0646 for more information.

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Aug 01

Using a Solo 401(k) to Invest in Bitcoin

Bitcoin is usually described as virtual currency. That’s useful shorthand, but is it really money? And should it be taxed as if it is? Or is it a capital asset? How about a commodity? Or what about a collectible? Most commentators have viewed bitcoins either as a virtual type of currency or capital asset. However, the potential still exists that the IRS could argue that bitcoins do not satisfy the main functions of money and acts more like a stamp or other collectible than a currency.

Using a Btcoin 401k to Invest in virtual currency.In Notice 2014-21, the IRS stated that it would tax digital money such as bitcoin like property, not currency. On March 25, 2014, the IRS issued Notice 2014-21, which for the first time set forth the IRS position on the taxation of bitcoins. According to the IRS, “Virtual currency is treated as property for U.S. federal tax purposes,” the notice said. “General tax principles that apply to property transactions apply to transactions using virtual currency.” By treating bitcoins as property and not currency, the IRS is providing a potential boost to investors but it is also imposing extensive record-keeping rules—and significant taxes—on its use. In a notice, the IRS said that it generally would treat bitcoin held by investors much like stock or other intangible property. If the virtual currency is held for investment, any gains would be treated as capital gains, meaning they could be subject to lower tax rates. The top long-term capital gains tax rate is 20%, while the top ordinary income-tax rate is 39.6%, although add-on taxes often make both rates somewhat higher. But as capital investments, loss deductions from bitcoin often would be limited, whereas currency losses can be easier to deduct up front.

The IRS guidance in Notice 2014-21 targets a new crop of digital currencies used by a small number of merchants, consumers and investors. Bitcoin, the best-known of the group, is created using a computer process and can be exchanged for dollars online.

Although IRS Notice 2014-21 did not address whether bitcoins would be considered an approved investment for retirement purposes, the fact that the Notice is treating bitcoins as property, like stock, and not as a collectible, it should be clear bitcoin is an approved investment for IRAs and 401(k) plans and would not violate IRC 408(m).

For many retirement investors, the investment in bitcoins via a Solo 401(k) plan could prove a very tax efficient manner for transacting with bicoins as use of bitcoin in a retail transaction typically would be a taxable “event” for many buyers, requiring them to figure out the gain they had made on the virtual currency—and eventually pay tax on it, whereas, the gains would likely not be subject to tax with retirement funds. However, the IRS stated in the Notice that bitcoin “miners”—including people who use computers to validate bitcoin transactions or maintain transaction ledgers—also would be subject to tax on payments received in bitcoin and that “mining” that constitutes a trade or business would be subject to self-employment taxes. Accordingly, dealers in bitcoin—much like dealers in other types of property—would be subject to different tax principles than individual investors, and their gains generally would be taxed as ordinary income.

Notice 2014-21 is important because it sets forth some clarity by the IRS about the tax treatment of virtual currencies, but it also raised new questions, such as what government body would be in charge of regulation.

With IRA Financial Group’s self-directed retirement plans, retirement account investors have the ability to make traditional as well as alternative asset investments, such as real estate and bitcoins, in a tax-deferred or tax-free basis.

Why Work With the IRA Financial Group?

The IRA Financial Group was founded by a group of top law firm tax and ERISA lawyers who have worked at some of the largest law firms in the United States, such as White & Case LLP, Dewey & LeBoeuf LLP, and Thelen LLP. Over the years, we have helped thousands of clients establish IRS compliant Self-Directed retirement solutions. With our work experience at some of the largest law firms in the country, our retirement tax professionals’ tax and IRA knowledge in this area is unmatched.

To learn more about using a “Checkbook Control” Solo 401(k) to make bitcoin and other investments without tax, please contact one of our 401(k) Experts at 800-472-0646 for more information.

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Jul 18

Can an Individual Adopt a Separate Solo 401(k) Plan for Another Entity or Business?

One must first determine whether adopting the additional Solo 401(k) would violate the CONTROLLED GROUP RULES set up by the IRS and Department of Labor.

The Controlled Group Rules were created essentially to protect employees from a business owner or executive establishing a separate 401(k) plan for another business and thereby not offering those employees the benefits inherent in participating in a 401(k) qualified retirement plan.

The IRS and Department of Labor were concerned that business owners wanting to establish a qualified retirement plan, but not wanting the burden of having to provide benefits to all eligible employees, would create a new separate business which would have no employees other than the owner or executive and then adopt a solo 401(k) plan for that company. Since the new company would be wholly owned by the business owner and would not have any full-time employees, the business owner could establish his or her own solo 401(k) plan and, thus, enjoy all the benefits of having a qualified retirement plan without having to provide any benefit to the employees from the other company.

WHAT IS A CONTROLLED GROUP OF CORPORATIONS?

As per Internal Revenue Code Section 414, a controlled group is any two or more corporations connected through stock ownership in any of the following ways:

Parent-subsidiary group

  • 80% of stock of each (subsidiary) corporation is owned by another member of the group
  • Parent corporation must own 80% of the stock of at least one of the other members of the group
  • The rules are subject to the stock attribution rules under Internal Revenue Code Section 318

Brother-sister group

  • The same five or fewer individuals own at least 80% of the stock of the corporations
  • “Individual” includes ownership by an estate or trust
  • “Ownership” includes having a controlling interest and effective control of the corporations
  • The rules are subject to the stock attribution rules under Internal Revenue Code Section 318

Combined group

  • Combination of a Parent-subsidiary and a Brother-sister group

Can an Individual Adopt a Separate Solo 401(k) Plan for Another Entity or Business?HOW DOES ONE DETERMINE WHO IS PART OF A CONTROLLED GROUP?

To determine whether one is part of a controlled group, one must take into account the stock attribution rules.

The purpose of the stock attribution rules is to attribute shares, or interest in a company held by certain family members, to the person in question and determine whether that person is part of a controlled group. Internal Revenue Code Section 318 governs the stock attribution rules. Pursuant to Internal Revenue Code Section 318,an individual shall be considered as owning the stock, owned directly or indirectly, by or for –

(i) his/her spouse (other than a spouse who is legally separated from the individual under a decree of divorce or separate maintenance)

(ii) his/her children, grandchildren, parents

CAN THE COMPANIES IN A CONTROLLED GROUP BE TREATED AS SEPARATE COMPANIES?

IRS does have a procedure through which a company can request to be treated as a Separate Line of Business. (see IRC §414(r)) . Following are limitations for these requests:

  • Must have a valid business purposes
  • Must have at least 50 employees within each line of business
  • Restrictions on HCE ratios in each separate line of business
  • Must notify IRS to request their approval

DO ALL MEMBERS OF A CONTROLLED GROUP HAVE TO PARTICIPATE IN ONE PLAN?

No. Members of a controlled group may each have a different plan. Similarly, two or more members of the controlled group may adopt a single plan. In either case, all employees of the controlled group must be taken into account for testing purposes.

For example, if one company is owned by a shareholder with greater than 80% and has no employees, but that same person also has ownership of over 80% in another company with full-time employees, a single plan may be adopted for both companies. However, the adopted plan must provide benefits to the eligible employees from the second company.

In other words, the rules are in place to restrict the owner(s) of a business with full-time employee from establishing a new company with no employees and adopt a Solo 401(k) plan that would exclude the full-time employees from the other company. The IRS and Department of Labor wanted to make sure that all eligible employees of a company that is part of a controlled group receives all available retirement benefits.

Controlled Group Examples:

Example 1: Joe owns 90% of Company A that has 3 employees. Joe wants to adopt a qualified retirement plan, but does not want to offer any benefits to his employees. Joe decides he will establish a new company that has no employees and adopt a Solo 401(k) Plan through that new company. Before proceeding, Joe talks with a tax attorney about his idea. Joe’s tax attorney quickly points out that since Joe would own more than 80% of Company A and the newly established company, both companies would be part of a controlled group. This would prohibit Joe from establishing a plan for the new company without offering the employees from Company A the same plan benefits.

Example 2. Joe owns 45% of Company A and Joe’s son, Mike, owns the remaining 55% interest. Company A has 5 full-time employees. Joe and Mike want to establish a 401(k) plan so they make tax-deferred contributions, but don’t want to provide the employees with any plan benefits. Joe and Mike come up with the idea of forming a new company that will have no employees other than themselves and adopt a 401(k) plan through the new company. Joe talks this over with his tax attorney and learns that since Joe and Mike are father and son, under Internal Revenue Code Section 318 they will be treated as owning each other’s shares, giving them each over 80% interest in Company A and, thus, triggering the controlled group rules. Hence, Joe and Mike would be limited from opening a 401(k) plan for the new business and not offering plan benefits to the employees from Company A. Joe and Mike could establish a plan for the new company, but the controlled group rules would require that the plan benefits be provided to all eligible employees from both companies.

Example 3. Joe owns 78% of Company A and Tim, his friend, owns the remaining 22%. Company A has 12 full-time employees. Company A does not have a 401(k) Plan. Tim does some consulting on a part-time basis and wants to establish a new corporation for his consulting business as well as establish a Solo 401(k) plan. Tim speaks with his tax attorney to inquire whether he could adopt a Solo 401(k) plan for his new business without being required to offer benefits to the 12 full-time employees with Company A. Tim’s tax attorney told Tim that because he owns less than 80% of Company A, his new consulting company would not be part of a controlled group and, thus, he would not be required to offer 401(k) benefits from his new company to the Company A employees.

Example 4. Joe and Tim each own 50% of Company A, which has 4 full-time employees. Company A currently offers its employees 401(k) plan benefits. Joe and Tim are each over the age of 59 ½ and are interested in using some of their retirement funds to purchase real estate. Unfortunately, Company A’s retirement plan does not allow for non-traditional investments, such as real estate. Joe and Tim decide to establish a new corporation, which they will each own 50% of and then have that new company adopt a new 401(k) plan. Before proceeding, Joe and Tim decided to speak with their tax attorney to make sure this strategy would work. Joe and Tim’s tax attorney advised them that as the new company will be owned by the both of them, just like Company A, the controlled group rules would be triggered since the same five or fewer individuals own at least 80% of the stock of the two corporations. Thus, Jim and Tim would not be able to adopt a new 401(k) plan without offering the same benefits to the employees from Company A.

To learn more about how the controlled group rules as they apply to the establishment of a Solo 401(k) plan, please contact a tax expert at 800-472-0646.

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Jul 05

How to Borrow from Your Solo 401k Plan

As long as the plan documents allow for it & the proper loan documents are prepared and executed, a participant loan can be made for any reason. The Solo 401k loan is received tax free and penalty free. There are no penalties or taxes due provided loan payments are paid on time. The IRA Financial Group Solo 401(k) Plan documents will allow you to use a loan from your Solo 401(k) for any investment purposes, including real estate, funding your business or a new business, tax liens, private placements, etc.

What is a Solo 401(k) Plan Loan?

How to Borrow from Your Solo 401k PlanA Solo 401(k) loan is permitted at any time using the accumulated balance of the Solo 401(k) as collateral for the loan. A Solo 401(k) participant can borrow up to $50,000 or 50% of their account value – whichever is less. This loan has to be repaid over an amortization schedule of 5 years or less with payment frequency no greater than quarterly. The interest rate must be set at a reasonable rate of interest, generally interpreted as prime rate as per the Wall Street Journal. As of 6/23/17 prime rate is 4.25%, which means participant loans may be set at a very reasonable Interest rate. The Interest rate is fixed based on the prime rate at the time of the loan application.

How Can This be Done?

Internal Revenue Code Section 72(p) and the 2001 EGGTRA rules allow a Solo 401(k) Plan participant to borrow money from the plan tax-free and without penalty. As long as the plan documents allow for it and the proper loan documents are prepared and executed, a participant loan can be made for any reason. The solo 401(k) loan is received tax-free and penalty-free. There are no penalties or taxes due provided loan payments are paid on time. The IRA Financial Group Solo 401(k) Plan documents will allow you to use a loan from your Solo 401(k) for any investment purposes, including real estate, funding your business or a new business, tax liens, private placements, etc. Our in-house retirement tax professionals will assist you in completing the Solo 401(k) Plan documents in a timely manner once your Solo 401(k) Plan has been adopted.

When can a Participant Loan be Useful?

As a result of the recent economic meltdown, banks and other financial institutions have severely limited their lending capacity to self-employed business owners, thus, causing grave financial pressure on self-employed business owners. The Solo 401(k) plan is a perfect structure for any self-employed business owner seeking immediate funds for their business or to help pay personal expenses. Solo 401(k) participants can borrow up to $50,000 or 50% of their account value, whichever is less, to help finance or operate their business. For example, an individual can take a Solo 401(k) Plan loan and use those funds to pay off a mortgage, credit card, any personal expense, go on vacation, or start and finance a business.

Please contact one of our 401(k) Experts at 800-472-0646 for more information.

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Feb 02

How Do You Take a Solo 401(k) Loan?

As long as the plan documents allow for it & the proper loan documents are prepared and executed, a participant loan can be made for any reason. The Solo 401(k) loan is received tax free and penalty free. There are no penalties or taxes due provided loan payments are paid on time. The IRA Financial Group Solo 401(k) Plan documents will allow you to use a loan from your Solo 401(k) for any investment purposes, including real estate, funding your business or a new business, tax liens, private placements, etc.

What is a Solo 401(k) Plan Loan?

A Solo 401(k) loan is permitted at any time using the accumulated balance of the Solo 401(k) as collateral for the loan. A Solo 401(k) participant can borrow up to $50,000 or 50% of their account value – whichever is less. This loan has to be repaid over an amortization schedule of 5 years or less with payment frequency no greater than quarterly. The interest rate must be set at a reasonable rate of interest, generally interpreted as prime rate as per the Wall Street Journal. As of 1/1/17 prime rate is 3.75%, which means participant loans may be set at a very reasonable Interest rate. The Interest rate is fixed based on the prime rate at the time of the loan application.

How Do You Take a Solo 401(k) Loan?How Can This be Done?

Internal Revenue Code Section 72(p) and the 2001 EGGTRA rules allow a Solo 401(k) Plan participant to borrow money from the plan tax-free and without penalty. As long as the plan documents allow for it and the proper loan documents are prepared and executed, a participant loan can be made for any reason. The solo 401(k) loan is received tax-free and penalty-free. There are no penalties or taxes due provided loan payments are paid on time. The IRA Financial Group Solo 401(k) Plan documents will allow you to use a loan from your Solo 401(k) for any investment purposes, including real estate, funding your business or a new business, tax liens, private placements, etc. Our in-house retirement tax professionals will assist you in completing the Solo 401(k) Plan documents in a timely manner once your Solo 401(k) Plan has been adopted.

When can a Participant Loan be Useful?

As a result of the recent economic meltdown, banks and other financial institutions have severely limited their lending capacity to self-employed business owners, thus, causing grave financial pressure on self-employed business owners. The Solo 401(k) plan is a perfect structure for any self-employed business owner seeking immediate funds for their business or to help pay personal expenses. Solo 401(k) participants can borrow up to $50,000 or 50% of their account value, whichever is less, to help finance or operate their business. For example, an individual can take a Solo 401(k) Plan loan and use those funds to pay off a mortgage, credit card, any personal expense, go on vacation, or start and finance a business.

Please contact one of our 401(k) Experts at 800-472-0646 for more information.

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Dec 16

2016 401k Contribution Deadline – December 31

The deadline for making Solo 401K Plan contributions is typically dependent on the type of entity that has adopted the Solo 401K Plan as well as the type of contribution – employee deferral vs. profit sharing contribution.

Sole Proprietorship

Employee Deferral

In the case of a sole proprietorship, a business owner under the age of 50 may make employee deferral contributions up to $18,000 for 2016 (an employee over the age of 50 may make a $6,000 annual catch-up contribution for an annual deferral contribution imitation of $24,000). An Employee must elect to make the employee deferral contribution by December 31 of the year. However, the employer deferral contribution can be made up until the tax-filing deadline.

The employee deferral contribution can be made using pre-tax and/or after-tax (Roth) funds.

Profit Sharing Contribution

The sole proprietorship business may make annual profit sharing contributions for the business owner and spouse annually. Internal Revenue Code Section 401(a)(3) states that the amount of employer contributions is limited to 25 percent of the entity’s income subject to self-employment tax. Schedule C sole-proprietors must do an added calculation starting with earned income to determine their maximum contribution, which, in effect, brings the maximum 25% of compensation limit down to 20% of earned income. A step-by-step worksheet for this calculation can be found in IRS Publication 560. In general, compensation is your net earnings from self-employment. This definition takes into account both of the following items: (i) the deduction for one-half of your self-employment tax, and (ii) the deduction for contributions on your behalf to the plan.

The profit sharing contribution must be made by the business’s tax-filing deadline.

Single Member LLC

Employee Deferral

In the case of a single member LLC, the single member LLC owner under the age of age 50 may make employee deferral contributions up to $18,000 for 2016 (an employee over the age of 50 may make a $6,000 annual catch-up contribution for an annual deferral contribution limitation of $24,000). The single member LLC owner must elect to make the employee deferral contribution by December 31 of the year. However, the employer deferral contribution can be made up until the tax-filing deadline.

The employee deferral contribution can be made using pre-tax and/or after-tax (Roth) funds.

Profit Sharing Contribution

The single Member LLC business may make annual profit sharing contributions for the business owner and spouse annually. Internal Revenue Code Section 401(a)(3) states that the amount of employer contributions is limited to 25 percent of the entity’s income subject to self- employment tax. Schedule C single member LLC owners must do an added calculation starting with earned income to determine their maximum contribution, which, in effect, brings the maximum 25% of compensation limit down to 20% of earned income. A step-by-step worksheet for this calculation can be found in IRS Publication 560. In general, compensation is your net earnings from self-employment. This definition takes into account both of the following items: (i) the deduction for one-half of your self-employment tax, and (ii) the deduction for contributions on your behalf to the plan.

Profit-sharing contributions must be funded by the business’s tax-filing deadline.

Multiple-Member LLC

Employee Deferral

In the case of a multiple member LLC, the multiple-member LLC owners under the age of age 50 may make employee deferral contributions up to $18,000 for 2016 (an employee over the age of 50 may make a $6,000 annual catch-up contribution for an annual deferral contribution limitation of $24,000). The multiple-member LLC owners must elect to make the employee deferral contribution by December 31 of the year. However, the employee deferral contribution can be made up until the tax-filing deadline.

The employee deferral contribution can be made using pre-tax and/or after-tax (Roth) funds.

Profit Sharing Contribution

The multiple-member LLC business may make annual profit sharing contributions for the business owners annually. Internal Revenue Code Section 401(a)(3) states that the amount of employer profit sharing contributions is limited to 25 percent of the entity’s income subject to self-employment tax. Profit-sharing contributions must be funded by the business’s tax-filing deadline.

C Corporation & S Corporation

Employee Deferral

An employee of a corporation will receive a W-2. When it comes to making employee deferral contributions, the employee must make the deferral contribution during the year. The timing of the deferral contribution will typically depend on the business. In the case of a corporation that uses a payroll company, the employee deferral will typically be deducted from the employee’s paycheck. If the company does not use a payroll system, the employee can elect to make deferral contributions at anytime during the year. Once the election is made the Department of Labor safe harbor is that the funds are deposited into the Solo 401(k) Plan account within 7 days. The employee making the employee contribution should make sure that he or she has earned enough compensation during the pay period to cover the employee contribution. For example, if the employee wishes to make a employee deferral contribution of $18,000 on December 30th, the employee will need to be sure that he or she has earned sufficient compensation during the pay period to cover the deferral contribution.

The employee deferral contribution can be made using pre-tax and/or after-tax (Roth) funds.

Profit Sharing Contributions

The corporation may make profit sharing contributions for corporation’s owner(s)/employee(s) annually. Internal Revenue Code Section 401(a)(3) states that the amount of employer profit sharing contributions is limited to 25 percent of the entity’s income subject to self-employment tax.

Profit-sharing contributions must be funded by the business’s tax-filing deadline.

Please contact one of our Solo 401k Experts at 800-472-0646 for more information.

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Nov 08

Do I Need to Pay for a Custodian with a Solo 401k Plan?

No. The most significant cost benefit of the Solo 401(k) Plan is that it does not require the participant to hire a bank or trust company to serve as trustee. This flexibility allows the participant to serve in the trustee role. This means that all assets of the 401(k) trust are under the sole authority of the Solo 401(k) participant.  A Solo 401(k) plan allows you to eliminate the expense and delays associated with an IRA custodian, enabling you to act quickly when the right investment opportunity presents itself.

Do I Need to Pay for a Custodian with a Solo 401k Plan?

Please contact one of our 401(k) Experts at 800-472-0646 for more information.

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