Sep 30

Forbes.com Publishes Article on Rollover Business Start-up (ROBS) Written By Adam Bergman

Adam Bergman is a contributor to Forbes.com on the topic of retirement taxation, contributes articles on using retirement funds to buy a business

Adam Bergman, partner with the IRA Financial Group, has just written an article published on Forbes.com that addresses the legality of the Rollover Business Startup (ROBS) solution. The article titled, “Robbing Your Retirement Account To Fund Your Business Invites IRS Scrutiny” discusses some of the problem areas and compliance issues the Internal Revenue Service has addresses regarding using the ROBS structure to buy a business or franchise.

Adam Bergman is a senior tax partner with the IRA Financial Group, LLC, the markets leading provider of Self-Directed IRA LLC and Solo 401(k) plans. Mr. Bergman is also the managing partner of the law firm The Bergman Law Group, LLC. In addition, Mr. Bergman is a recognized expert on IRAs and 401(k) Plans and is the founder of the BergmanIRAReport.com and the Bergman401KReport.com. Mr. Bergman is the author of the book titled, “Going Solo: America’s Best Kept Retirement Secret For the Self-Employed,” available on Amazon, and is a frequent contributor to Forbes. Mr. Bergman has advised over 12,000 clients on the Self-Directed IRA LLC and Solo 401(k) Plan solutions.

Forbes.com Publishes Article on Rollover Business Start-up (ROBS) Written By Adam BergmanMr. Bergman has been quoted in a number of major publications on the area of self-directed retirement plans. Mr. Bergman has been interviewed on CBS News and has been quoted in Businessweek, CNN Money, Forbes, Dallas Morning News, Daily Business Review, Law.com, San Francisco Chronicle, U.S. Tax News, the Miami Herald, Bloomberg, Arizona Republic, San Antonio Express, Findlaw, Smart Money, USA Today, Houston Chronicle, Morningstar, and American Lawyer on the area of retirement tax planning.

Prior to joining the IRA Financial Group, LLC, Mr. Bergman worked as a tax and ERISA attorney at White & Case LLP, Dewey LeBoeuf LLP, and Thelen LLP, three of the most prominent corporate law firms in the world. Throughout his career, Mr. Bergman has advised thousands of clients on a wide range of tax and ERISA matters involving limited liability companies and retirement plans. Mr. Bergman received his B.A. (with distinction) from McGill University and his law degree (cum laude) from Syracuse University College of Law. Mr. Bergman also received his Masters of Taxation (LL.M.) from New York University School of Law.

Mr. Bergman is recognized as a leading retirement tax-planning expert and has lectured attorneys on the legal and tax aspects of Self-Directed IRA LLC and Solo 401(k) Plans. Mr. Bergman has also been retained by several leading IRA custodians, including Entrust, to offer expertise on the Self-Directed IRA structure. Mr. Bergman is a member of the Tax Division of the American Bar Association and New York State Bar Association.

The IRA Financial Group was founded by a group of top law firm tax and ERISA lawyers who have worked at some of the largest law firms in the United States, such as White & Case LLP, Dewey & LeBoeuf LLP, and Thelen LLP.

IRA Financial Group is the market’s leading “checkbook control” Self Directed IRA and Solo 401(k) Plan provider. IRA Financial Group has helped thousands of clients take back control over their retirement funds while gaining the ability to invest in almost any type of investment, including real estate without custodian consent.

To learn more about the IRA Financial Group please visit our website at http://www.irafinancialgroup.com or call 800-472-0646.

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Sep 28

How Are Roth 401k Distributions Taxed?

All distributions from Roth 401(k) plans are either qualified distributions or nonqualified distributions. If the distribution is a qualified distribution, the early distribution tax does not apply. The early distribution tax applies only to those distributions that are subject to income tax. Because all qualified distributions from Roth 401(k) Plans are tax free, they are also exempt from the early distribution tax as well.

A “ qualified distribution” from a Roth IRA is excluded from gross income. To be qualified, a distribution must satisfy both of the following requirements:

  • It must not occur before the fifth taxable year following the year for which a Roth IRA contribution was first made by the taxpayer or the taxpayer’s spouse.
  • It must be made after the account owner reaches age 59 1/2 or becomes disabled, be made to the owner’s beneficiary or estate after the owner’s death, or be a “qualified special purpose distribution.”

For more information, please contact us @ 800.472.0646.

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Sep 25

New Podcast – Considering Doing a ROBS – Things You Should Consider

IRA Financial Group’s Adam Bergman discusses important items to think about when considering setting up a ROBS (Rollover Business Startup) solution.

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Click Here to Listen

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Sep 24

Benefits of Using the Solo 401k Loan Feature

As a result of the recent economic meltdown, banks and other financial institutions have severely limited their lending capacity to self-employed business owners, thus, causing grave financial pressure on self-employed business owners. The Solo 401(k) Plan is a perfect structure for any self employed business owner seeking immediate funds for their business. Solo 401(k) participants can borrow up to either $50,000 or 50% of their account value – whichever is less to help finance or operate their business. Other useful ways of using the participant loan feature is to:

Benefits of Using the Solo 401k Loan Feature

  • Lend the funds to a third-party who will pay a higher interest rate
  • Invest in a real estate project that offers a higher rate of return than the low interest rate you must pay
  • To consolidate debt
  • To pay for college expenses
  • To pay for unexpected emergencies
  • Avoid distribution penalties and gain use up to $50,000 immediately with no restrictions
  • Invest in a new franchise or business
  • Make any alternative Investment that will generate a higher rate of return than the low Interest rate imposed on you, such as tax liens, private placements, or mortgage pools.
  • Invest in a transaction that would otherwise be a Prohibited Transaction under Internal Revenue Code Section 4975.
  • Quick, easy, and cheap access to a $50,000 loan to be used for any purpose

Please contact one of our 401(k) Experts at 800-472-0646 for more information.

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Sep 23

What Are the Requirements to Open a Solo 401k?

A Solo 401(k) Plan is well suited for businesses that either do not employ any employees or employee certain employees that may be excluded from coverage. A Solo 401(k) plan is perfect for any sole proprietor, consultant, or independent contractor.

To be eligible to benefit from the Solo 401(k) plan, investor must meet just two eligibility requirements:

1. The presence of self employment activity.

2. The absence of full-time employees.

The Presence of Self Employment Activity

Self employment activity generally includes ownership and operation of a sole proprietorship, Limited Liability Company (LLC), C Corporation, S Corporation, and Limited Partnership where the business intends to generate revenue for profit and make significant contributions to the plan.

Generate Revenue for Profit

There are no established thresholds for how much profit the business must be generated, how much money must be contributed to the plan, or how soon profits and contributions must happen. It is generally believed that the IRS will consider you eligible if the business being conducted is a legitimate business that is run with the intention of generating profits. The self employment activity can be part time, and it can be ancillary to full time employment elsewhere. A person can even participate in an employer’s 401(k) plan in tandem with their own Solo 401(k). In such a case, the employee elective deferrals from both plans are subject to the single contribution limit.

The Absence of Full-Time Employees

Unlike a regular 401(k) plan, a Solo 401K plan can be implemented only by self-employed individuals or small business owners who have no other full-time employees and are not employed by any business owned by them or their spouse (an exception applies if your full-time employee is your spouse). The business owner and their spouse are technically considered “owner-employees” rather than “employees”.

The following types of employees may be generally excluded from coverage:

  • Employees under 21 years of age
  • Employees that work less than a 1000 hours annually
  • Union employees
  • Nonresident alien employees

If you have full-time employees age 21 or older (other than your spouse) or part-time employees who work more than 1,000 hours a year, you will typically have to include them in any plan you set up. However, a Solo 401k eligible business can have part time employees and independent contractors.

Please contact one of our 401(k) Experts at 800-472-0646 for more information.

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Sep 21

Going Solo – America’s Best Kept Retirement Secret For The Self-Employed by IRA Financial Group’s Adam Bergman Now Available on Amazon

Adam Bergman, a partner with the IRA Financial Group, authors book discussing the self-directed Solo 401(k) Plan

After several years of research and writing, the book Going Solo: America’s Best Kept Retirement Secret For the Self-Employed – What Financial Institutions Won’t Tell You About Saving for Retirement was released on Amazon. Authored by Adam Bergman, Esq., a partner with the IRA Financial Group, it is the market’s first book about the self-directed Solo 401(k) Plan.

The book discusses in detail the IRS approved Solo 401(k) Plan and the reason behind its increased popularity with the self-employed and small business owners with no full-time employees. The book was written to help the self-employed and small business owners better prepare themselves for retirement by understanding the exciting advantages of establishing a Solo 401(k) Plan. The book’s objective is show how the Solo 401(k) Plan can be a brilliant retirement wealth building tool and investment vehicle, allowing the self-employed to save more money and make their own investment decisions while enjoying the flexibility of customizing the plan to their situation and expertise.

“The Solo 401(k) plan is clearly the best retirement plan for the self-employed, undoubtedly more robust than the SEP IRA, and I hope this book shows how easy the plan is to adopt and the enormous retirement wealth building benefits it can provide,” stated Adam Bergman.

Going Solo – America’s Best Kept Retirement Secret For The Self-Employed by IRA Financial Group’s Adam Bergman Now Available on AmazonAdam Bergman is a senior tax partner with the IRA Financial Group, LLC, the market’s leading provider of Self-Directed IRA LLC and Solo 401(k) Plans. Mr. Bergman is also the managing partner of the law firm The Bergman Law Group, LLC. In addition, Mr. Bergman is a recognized expert on IRAs and 401(k) Plans and is the founder of the BergmanIRAReport.com and the Bergman401KReport.com. Mr. Bergman is the author of the book Going Solo: America’s Best Kept Retirement Secret For the Self-Employed, available on Amazon and is a frequent contributor to Forbes. Mr. Bergman has advised over 12,000 clients on the Self-Directed IRA LLC and Solo 401(k) Plan solutions.

Mr. Bergman has been quoted in a number of major publications on the area of self-directed retirement plans. Mr. Bergman has been interviewed on CBS News and has been quoted in Businessweek, CNN Money, Forbes, Dallas Morning News, Daily Business Review, Law.com, San Francisco Chronicle, U.S. Tax News, the Miami Herald, Bloomberg, Arizona Republic, San Antonio Express, Findlaw, Smart Money, USA Today, Houston Chronicle, Morningstar and American Lawyer on the area of retirement tax planning.

Prior to joining the IRA Financial Group, LLC, Mr. Bergman worked as a tax and ERISA attorney at White & Case LLP, Dewey LeBoeuf LLP, and Thelen LLP, three of the most prominent corporate law firms in the world. Throughout his career, Mr. Bergman has advised thousands of clients on a wide range of tax and ERISA matters involving limited liability companies and retirement plans. Mr. Bergman received his B.A. (with distinction) from McGill University and his law degree (cum laude) from Syracuse University College of Law. Mr. Bergman also received his Masters of Taxation (LL.M.) from New York University School of Law.

Mr. Bergman is recognized as a leading retirement tax-planning expert and has lectured attorneys on the legal and tax aspects of Self-Directed IRA LLC and Solo 401(k) Plans. Mr. Bergman has also been retained by several leading IRA custodians, including Entrust, to offer expertise on the Self-Directed IRA structure. Mr. Bergman is a member of the Tax Division of the American Bar Association and New York State Bar Association.

IRA Financial Group is the market’s leading “Checkbook Control” Self Directed IRA Facilitator. IRA Financial Group has helped thousands of clients take back control over their retirement funds while gaining the ability to invest in almost any type of investment, including real estate, without custodian consent.

To learn more about the IRA Financial Group please visit our website at http://www.irafinancialgroup.com or call 800-472-0646.

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Sep 18

Can I Use My 401k Funds to Invest in a Business?

If structured correctly, yes you can use your 401(k) to invest in a business. IRA Financial Group’s in-house retirement tax professionals have spent the last two years developing an IRS and ERISA compliant structure for using retirement funds to acquire or invest in a business tax free! Unlike our competitors who have been offering this type of structure for many years, the IRA Financial Group has patiently waited for clear IRS guidance in order to develop a structure that would be fully compliant with IRS and ERISA rules and procedures. The Business Acquisition Compliance and Support Structure (“BACSS”) was designed as an IRS and ERISA compliant structure for using retirement funds to acquire or invest in a business tax free! The Internal Revenue Code and ERISA law firmly establishes that the use of retirement funds to purchase stock of a sponsoring company is permitted as long as certain IRS and ERISA rules are followed. Based on IRS guidance, it is important that a qualified retirement plan be adopted by the new company and that it be used and operated as such.  It is also required that the value of the stock being purchased by the new Plan be valued by an independent appraisal and that the qualified retirement plan be made available to all eligible company’s employees.  Because the IRS has stressed the importance of compliance, it is crucial to work with a company that is operated by a team of in-house tax and ERISA professionals who have worked at some of the largest law firms in the United States, including White & Case LLP and Dewey & LeBoeuf LLP, to ensure the legality of the structure.

Can I Use My 401k Funds to Invest in a Business?Please contact one of our 401(k) Experts at 800-472-0646 for more information.

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Sep 17

Clarification About Holding IRS Approved Coins with a 401k Plan

The IRS does not list the type of assets or investments that may be purchased with retirement funds, but does indicate which categories of assets or investments are not permitted.

The categories of transactions that are not permitted to be purchased using a Solo 401(k) Plan can be found in Internal Revenue Code Sections 408 & 4975.

Does IRC 408 and 4975 Apply to Solo 401(k) Plans?

The Department of Labor (“DOL”) regulations provide that a plan that covers only partners or a sole proprietor is not covered under Title I of ERISA.

The provisions of Title I of ERISA, which are administered by the U.S. Department of Labor, were enacted to address public concern that funds of private pension plans were being mismanaged and abused. ERISA was the culmination of a long line of legislation concerned with the labor and tax aspects of employee benefit plans. The goal of Title I of ERISA is to protect the interests of participants and their beneficiaries in employee benefit plans. Hence, for plans that only cover owners, there is no need for ERISA since there are no non-owner employees to protect. Accordingly, most plan documents state that the rules set forth under Internal Revenue Code Section 408 will apply to Solo 401(k) Plan investments.

Introduction

When it comes to coins or metals, Internal Revenue Code Section 408 is generally the provision that applies. In general, collectibles such as artworks, rugs, stamps, certain coins, beverages and antiques, etc. are not allowed within a Solo 401(k) Plan pursuant to Internal Revenue Code Section 408.

Internal Revenue Code Section 408 is specific as to what defines a collectible. Some notable exceptions are allowed for certain gold (such as American Eagle) and silver coins and any coins issued by a state.

The Law

Internal Revenue Code Section 408(m):

(3) Exception for certain coins and bullion

For purposes of this subsection, the term “collectible” shall not include —

(A) any coin which is —

(i) a gold coin described in paragraph (7), (8), (9), or (10) of section 5112 (a) of title 31, United States Code,

(ii) a silver coin described in section 5112 (e) of title 31, United States Code,

(iii) a platinum coin described in section 5112 (k) of title 31, United States Code, or

(iv) a coin issued under the laws of any State, or

(B) any gold, silver, platinum, or palladium bullion of a fineness equal to or exceeding the minimum fineness that a contract market (as described in section 7 of the Commodity Exchange Act, 7 U.S.C. 7) requires for metals which may be delivered in satisfaction of a regulated futures contract if such bullion is in the physical possession of a trustee described under subsection (a) of this section.

Subsection (a) states:

(a) Individual retirement account

For purposes of this section, the term “individual retirement account” means a trust created or organized in the United States for the exclusive benefit of an individual or his beneficiaries, but only if the written governing instrument creating the trust meets the following requirements:

(1) Except in the case of a rollover contribution described in subsection (d)(3) in section 402 (c), 403 (a)(4), 403 (b)(8), or 457 (e)(16), no contribution will be accepted unless it is in cash, and contributions will not be accepted for the taxable year on behalf of any individual in excess of the amount in effect for such taxable year under section 219 (b)(1)(A).

(2) The trustee is a bank (as defined in subsection (n)) or such other person who demonstrates to the satisfaction of the Secretary that the manner in which such other person will administer the trust will be consistent with the requirements of this section.

(3) No part of the trust funds will be invested in life insurance contracts.

(4) The interest of an individual in the balance in his account is non-forfeitable.

(5) The assets of the trust will not be commingled with other property except in a common trust fund or common investment fund.

(6) Under regulations prescribed by the Secretary, rules similar to the rules of section 401 (a)(9) and the incidental death benefit requirements of section 401 (a) shall apply to the distribution of the entire interest of an individual for whose benefit the trust is maintained.

Hence, it is clear that in the case of physical metals, such as gold, the metals must be held in the physical possession of a U.S. trust (i.e. bank or depository), however, the “physical possession” requirement does not appear to relate to the possession of coins. A more detailed analysis will follow below.

31 U.S.C. 5112 refers to Denominations, specifications and design of coins.

(a) The Secretary of the Treasury may mint and issue only the following coins:

(1) a dollar coin that is 1.043 inches in diameter.

(2) a half dollar coin that is 1.205 inches in diameter and weighs 11.34 grams.

(3) a quarter dollar coin that is 0.955 inch in diameter and weighs 5.67 grams.

(4) a dime coin that is 0.705 inch in diameter and weighs 2.268 grams.

(5) a 5-cent coin that is 0.835 inch in diameter and weighs 5 grams.

(6) except as provided under subsection (c) of this section, a one-cent coin that is 0.75 inch in diameter and weighs 3.11 grams.

(7) A fifty dollar gold coin that is 32.7 millimeters in diameter, weighs 33.931 grams, and contains one troy ounce of fine gold.

(8) A twenty-five dollar gold coin that is 27.0 millimeters in diameter, weighs 16.966 grams, and contains one-half troy ounce of fine gold.

(9) A ten dollar gold coin that is 22.0 millimeters in diameter, weighs 8.483 grams, and contains one-fourth troy ounce of fine gold.

(10) and contains one-tenth troy ounce of fine gold.

(e) Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the Secretary shall mint and issue, in quantities sufficient to meet public demand, coins which —

(1) are 40.6 millimeters in diameter and weigh 31.103 grams;

(2) contain .999 fine silver;

(3) have a design —

(A) symbolic of Liberty on the obverse side; and

(B) of an eagle on the reverse side;

(k) The Secretary may mint and issue platinum bullion coins and proof platinum coins in accordance with such specifications, designs, varieties, quantities, denominations, and inscriptions as the Secretary, in the Secretary’s discretion, may prescribe from time to time.

Clarification About Holding IRS Approved Coins with a 401k PlanHow do I hold IRS Approved Coins with a Solo 401(k) Plan?

Now that you have a clear idea of the types of coins that the IRS allows to be purchased using retirement funds, the next questions becomes how can the coins be held without violating IRS rules.

Most people don’t realize that a coin can be treated as bullion. As a result, based on the language in IRC 408(m)(3)(B), all coins defined in IRC 408(m), including American Eagle and State minted coins must be held in the ‘physical possession’ of a U.S. trustee, just like all precious metals (i.e. pure gold and silver bars). Since IRS approved coins, such as American Eagle and State minted coins are considered bullion for purposes of Internal Revenue Code Section 408(m), all IRS approved coins, just like precious metals, should be held in the “physical possession” of a U.S. bank or depository.

Although, bullion may be cast into bars or minted into coins. The defining attribute of bullion is that it is valued by its mass and purity rather than by a face value as money. Hence, it appears that the “physical possession” requirement outlined for bullion in IRC 408(m)(3)(B) does pertain to coins, such as American Eagle coins, as defined in IRC 408(m)(3)(A), since they can be defined as bullion. That being said, it is best for retirement account holders to hold all IRS approved coins outlined in IRC 408(m) at a depository or bank safe deposit box and not in their personal possession. It is best practice to hold all IRS approved coins at a bank or depository, including the American Eagle and State minted coins.

Holding IRS Approved Coins in a Safe Deposit Box

IRC Section 408(m) clearly states that gold, silver, or palladium bullion, which includes IRS approved coins, must be held in the physical possession of a U.S. trustee, otherwise known as a U.S. bank or financial institution.

Here is the exact language from the tax code under IRC 408(m)(3)(B):

“Any gold, silver, platinum, or palladium bullion of a fineness equal to or exceeding the minimum fineness that a contract market (as described in section 7 of the Commodity Exchange Act, U.S.C.) requires for metals which may be delivered in satisfaction of a regulated futures contract, if such bullion is in the physical possession of a trustee described under subsection (a) of this section.”

The tax code clearly states that any IRS approved metals (bullion) must be held in the physical possession of a trustee, which we now know means a U.S. bank. So the question then becomes is whether holding IRS approved coins (bullion) in a safe deposit box at a U.S. bank in the name of the Self-Directed IRA LLC or Solo 401(k) plan that would be considered to be in the ‘physical possession’ of a U.S. trustee or bank and satisfy the definition under IRC 408(m)?

An argument can then be made that holding precious metals (bullion) at a U,S. bank safe deposit box would not be considered to be in the physical possession of the IRA holder since the bullion will physically be held in a safe deposit box of the bank in the name of the IRA LLC or Solo 401(k) plan. However, the safe deposit box is in the constructive control of the Self-Directed IRA LLC manager or Solo 401(k) plan trustee. That being said, the Internal Revenue Code under Section 408 clearly states ‘physical possession’ and not possession or ‘constructive control.’ From a legal standpoint, possession is not defined to represent control, meaning you can be in possession of an item but not in control or ownership of it. Therefore, many tax practitioners take the position that holding bullion in a safe deposit box in the name of the Self-Directed IRA LLC or Solo 401(k) plan would satisfy the ‘physical possession’ requirement under Internal Revenue Code Section 408(m).”

Unfortunately there is no IRS guidance on this. What is clear is that, IRS approved precious metals should not be stored in the home or personal possession of the Self-Directed IRA holder, individual Solo 401(k) plan participant, or any person that does not satisfy the definition of a trustee according to the Internal Revenue Code. It is good practice to hold IRS approved precious metals or coins owned by a retirement account at an IRS approved depository where it is clearly in the ‘physical possession’ of a US Bank (trustee as defined under IRC 408(a).

To learn more about purchasing and holding coins with a Solo 401(k) Plan please contact one our tax professionals at 800-472-0646.
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Sep 15

Are Contribution Rules for a Roth 401k the Same as a Roth IRA?

The Roth subaccount of the Solo 401(k) Plan is a bit of a hybrid. Although it is technically a type of 401(k) plan, it has some of the features of a Roth IRA. Only after-tax salary deferral contributions may be deposited in the Roth 401(k) subaccount. No employer contributions and no pretax employee contributions are permitted. Therefore the entire account will contain only after-tax contributions from your salary plus pretax earnings on those contributions. Because the Roth 401(k) is actually just part of a regular 401(k) plan, most of the rules that apply to a regular 401(k) plan also apply to a Roth 401(k) plan, including the contribution limits.

Are Contribution Rules for a Roth 401k the Same as a Roth IRA?For more information about the Roth Solo 401(k) Plan offered by the IRA Financial Group, please contact us @ 800.472.0646!

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Sep 14

Taking Advantage of a Solo 401k Loan

A solo 401k loan is permitted at any time using the accumulated balance of the solo 401k as collateral for the loan. A Solo 401(k) participant can borrow up to either $50,000 or 50% of their account value – whichever is less. This loan has to be repaid over an amortization schedule of 5 years or less with payment frequency no greater than quarterly. The interest rate must be set at a reasonable rate of interest – generally interpreted as prime rate as per the Wall Street Journal. As of 9/1/15 prime rate is 3.25%, which means participant loans may be set at a very reasonable interest rate. The Interest rate is fixed based on the prime rate at the time of the loan application.

How Can This be Done?

Internal Revenue Code Section 72(p) and the 2001 EGGTRA rules allow a Solo 401(k) Plan participant to borrow money from the plan tax-free and without penalty. As long as the plan documents allow for it & the proper loan documents are prepared and executed, a participant loan can be made for any reason. The solo 401k loan is received tax-free and penalty free. There are no penalties or taxes due provided loan payments are paid on time. The IRA Financial Group Solo 401(k) Plan documents will allow you to use a loan from your Solo 401(k) for any investment purposes, including real estate, funding your business or a new business, tax liens, private placements, etc. Our in-house retirement tax professionals will assist you in completing the Solo 401(k) Plan documents in a timely manner once your Solo 401(k) Plan has been adopted.

When can a Participant Loan be Useful?

As a result of the recent economic meltdown, banks and other financial institutions have severely limited their lending capacity to self-employed business owners, thus, causing grave financial pressure on self-employed business owners. The Solo 401(k) plan is a perfect structure for any self-employed business owner seeking immediate funds for their business or to help pay personal expenses. Solo 401(k) participants can borrow up to either $50,000 or 50% of their account value – whichever is less to help finance or operate their business.

Other useful ways of using the participant loan feature is to:

  • Lend the funds to a third-party who will pay a higher interest rate
  • Invest in a real estate project that offers a higher rate of return than the low interest rate you must pay
  • To consolidate debt
  • To pay for college expenses
  • To pay for unexpected emergencies
  • Avoid distribution penalties and use up to $50,000 immediately with no restrictions
  • Invest in a new franchise or business
  • Make any alternative Investment that will generate a higher rate of return than the low Interest rate imposed on you, such as tax liens, private placements, or mortgage pools
  • Invest in a transaction that would otherwise be a Prohibited Transaction under Internal Revenue Code Section 4975
  • Quick, easy, and cheap access to a $50,000 loan to be used for any purpose

 

Please contact one of our Solo 401k Experts at 800-472-0646 for more information.

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