Feb 20

The Legality of the Individual 401k Plan

The Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 ( ERISA) ( Pub.L. 93-406, 88  Stat. 829, enacted September 2, 1974) is an American federal statute that establishes minimum standards for pension plans in private industry and provides for extensive rules on the federal income tax effects of transactions associated with employee benefit plans. ERISA contained sweeping changes in the regulation of pension plans, and created rules regarding reporting and disclosure, funding, vesting, and fiduciary duties. Although ERISA was aimed mostly at “assuring the equitable character” and “financial soundness” of pension plans, the Act contained numerous provisions impacting plans (like profit-sharing plans, and eventually 401(k) plans). For example, ERISA contained a provision that allowed plans to delegate investment responsibility to participants and thereby relieve the plan sponsor from investment responsibility, which today is the basis for participant-directed 401(k) plans.

In 1978, Congress amended the Internal Revenue Code by adding section 401(k), whereby employees are not taxed on income they choose to receive as deferred compensation rather than direct compensation. The law went into effect on January 1, 1980. Although a tax code provision permitting cash or deferred arrangements (CODAs) was added in 1978 as Section 401(k), it was not until November 10, 1981 that the IRS formally described the rules for these plans.

The Legality of the Individual 401k PlanThe “one-participant 401(k) plan”, also known as an “Individual 401(k) plan” is an IRS approved type of qualified plan, which is suited for business owners who do not have any employees, other than themselves and perhaps their spouse. The “one-participant 401(k) plan” is not a new type of plan. It is a traditional 401(k) plan covering only one employee. The plans have the same rules and requirements as any other 401(k) plan. The surging interest in these plans is a result of the EGTRRA tax law change that became effective in 2002. The law changed how salary deferral contributions are treated when calculating the maximum deduction limits for contributions to a 401(k) plan. This change created an opportunity for some people to put away additional amounts toward their retirement.

It was not until the late 1990s that the regulatory climate began to change for 401(k) plans. In 1996, as part of a package of reforms aimed at bolstering small businesses— the Small Business Job Protection Act of 1996 (SBJPA) , Congress acted to encourage employers to offer retirement plans, including 401(k) plans. The SBJPA simplified nondiscrimination tests and repealed rules imposing limits on the contributions that could be made to a retirement plan by an employee that also participated in a DB plan. In addition, starting in the late 1990s, the IRS issued a series of rulings allowing automatic enrollment.

The Economic Growth and Tax Relief Reconciliation Act of 2001 (EGTRRA) contained many provisions that affected qualified retirement plans in a positive way. Two of the most significant changes were the increase in the maximum salary deferral amount for 401(k) plans along with a “catch-up” contribution and the ability to receive an allocation under the plan.

According to the IRS, there are approximately one million private retirement plans covering over 99 million participants.

IRS Publication 560 sets forth the general rules pertaining to a small business retirement plan, such as a Solo 401(k) Plan.

For additional information on the legality of the Solo 401(k) Plan, please contact one of our 401(k) Experts at 800-472-0646.

IRA Financial Group Facebook pageIRA Financial Group Twitter pageamazon-logoIRA Financial Group Tumblr pageIRA Financial Group Pinterest page

Feb 15

What Types of Transactions May Trigger the UBTI Tax with a Solo 401k?

In general, most passive investments that your Solo 401(k) Plan might invest in are exempt from UBTI. Some examples of exempt type of income include: interest from loans, dividends, annuities, royalties, most rentals from real estate, and gains/losses from the sale of real estate.

When an exempt organization such as an 401(k) Plan undertakes any development activities in connection with selling real estate, beyond passively placing the property for sale either directly or through a broker, the issue arises under Internal Revenue Code 512(b)(5)(A) whether the real estate is “property held primarily for sale to customers on the ordinary course of the trade or business.” An organization that engages in the sale of property to customers in the ordinary course of the trade or business is characterized as acting as a “dealer.

What Types of Transactions May Trigger the UBTI Tax with a Solo 401k?Fundamental to considering whether an exempt organization (i.e. a 401(k) Plan) is a “dealer” of real property is whether the property itself is held “primarily” for resale to customers in the ordinary course of a trade or business. In Malat v. Riddell, 393 U.S. 569 (1966), the U.S. Supreme Court interpreted the meaning of the phrase “held primarily for sale to customers in the ordinary course of trade or business” under Internal Revenue Code Section 1221(1). The IRS has often applied the principles derived under Internal Revenue Code Section 1221 to rulings interpreting the language of Internal Revenue Code Section 512(b)(5). The Court interpreted the word “primarily” to mean “of first importance” or “principally.” By this standard, ordinary income would not result unless a sales purpose is dominant. Both the courts and the IRS concluded that a taxpayer may make “reasonable expenditures and efforts” (such as subdividing land, construction of streets, the provision of drainage, and furnishing of access to such a necessity as water, as part of the “liquidation” of an investment asset without being treated as engaged in a trade or business.

The UBTI generally applies to the taxable income of “any unrelated trade or business…regularly carried on” by an organization subject to the tax. The regulations separately treat three aspects of the quoted words—“trade or business,” “regularly carried on,” and “unrelated.”

Trade or Business: In defining “unrelated trade or business,” the regulations start with the concept of “trade or business” as used by Internal Revenue Code Section 162, which allows deductions for expenses paid or incurred “in carrying on any trade or business.” Although Internal Revenue Code Section 162 is a natural starting point, the case law under that provision does little to clarify the issues. Because expenses incurred by individuals in profit-oriented activities not amounting to a trade or business are deductible under Internal Revenue Code Section 212 , it is rarely necessary to decide whether an activity conducted for profit is a trade or business. The few cases on the issue under Internal Revenue Code Section 162 generally limit the term “trade or business” to profit-oriented endeavors involving regular activity by the taxpayer.

Regularly Carried On: The UBIT only applies to income of an unrelated trade or business that is “regularly carried on” by an organization (Solo 401(k) Plan investment). Whether a trade or business is regularly carried on is determined in light of the underlying objective to reach activities competitive with taxable businesses. The requirement thus is met by activities that “manifest a frequency and continuity, and are pursued in a manner generally similar to comparable commercial activities of nonexempt organizations.” Short-term activities are exempted if comparable commercial activities of private enterprises are usually conducted on a year-round basis (e.g., a sandwich stand operated by an exempt organization at a state fair), but a seasonal activity is considered regularly carried on if its commercial counterparts also operate seasonally (e.g., a horse racing track). Intermittent activities are similarly compared with their commercial rivals and are ordinarily exempt if conducted without the promotional efforts typical of commercial endeavors. Moreover, if an enterprise is conducted primarily for beneficiaries of an organization’s exempt activities (e.g., a student bookstore), casual sales to outsiders are ordinarily not a “regular” trade or business.

Before it can be determined whether an activity is seasonal or intermittent, the relevant activity must be identified and quantified, a step that is often troublesome. The type of income that generally could subject a Solo 401K Plan to UBTI is income generated from the following sources:

  • Business income generated via a passthrough entity, such as an LLC or partnership
  • Income earned from a convenient store operated through a passthrough entity
  • Income earned through an active business owned by an LLC in which the IRA is an investor
  • Income from a real estate investment held through a passthrough entity that is treated as a business (inventory) instead of as an investment

Examples could include:

  • In Brown v. Comr, 143 F.2d 468 (5th Cir. 1944), the exempt taxpayer owned 500 acres of unimproved land used for grazing purposes within its tax-exempt mission. Taxpayer decided to sell the land and listed it with a real estate broker. The exempt organization instructed the broker to subdivide the land into lots and develop it for sale. The broker had the land plotted and laid into subdivisions with several lots. Streets were cleared, graded and shelled; storm sewers were put in at street intersections; gas and electric lines were constructed; and a water well was dug. Each year 20 to 30 properties were sold. The court held that the taxpayer was holding lots for sale to customers in the regular course of business. The court identified the sole question for its determination as whether the taxpayer was in the business of subdividing real estate. The fact that the taxpayer did not buy additional land did not prevent the court from finding that the sales activities resulted in an active trade or business.
  • In Farley v. Comr., 7 T.C. 198 (1946), the taxpayer sold 25 lots out of a tract of land previously used in his nursery business but now more desirable as residential property. Because the taxpayer made no active efforts to sell and did not develop the property, the court described the sale as “in the nature of the gradual and passive liquidation of an asset.” Therefore, the income derived from the sales represented capital gains income, rather than ordinary income from the regular course of business as in the Brown case.
  • Dispositions of several thousand acres of land by a school over a period of twenty-five years does not constitute sale of land held primarily for sale to customers in the ordinary course of business and thus gains are excludable under Internal Revenue Code Section 512(b)(5) (Priv. Ltr. Rul. 9619069 (Feb. 13, 1996)).
  • Developing or subdividing land and selling a large number of homes or tracts of land from that development in a given period.
  • Buying a property/home rehabbing it and then selling it immediately thereafter when this was your sole intent (note: The activity must manifest a frequency and continuity, and are pursued in a manner generally similar to comparable commercial activities of nonexempt organizations). It is unclear whether the purchase and sale of one or two homes in a given year that were held for investment purposes would trigger UBTI.

Please contact one of our Solo 401(k) Experts at 800-472-0646 for more information.

IRA Financial Group Facebook pageIRA Financial Group Twitter pageamazon-logoIRA Financial Group Tumblr pageIRA Financial Group Pinterest page

Feb 12

The Advantages of Using ROBS to Start Your Business

When it comes to using retirement funds to buy or finance a business that you or another “disqualified person” will be involved in personally, there is only one legal way to do it and that is through the Business Acquisition Solution, also known as a Rollover Business Start-Up (ROBS). The ROBS solution takes advantage of an exception in the tax code under Internal Revenue Code (“IRC”) Section 4975(d) that allows one to use 401(k) plan funds to buy stock in a “C” Corporation, which is known as “qualifying employer securities”. The exception to the IRS prohibited transaction rules found in IRC 4975(d) requires that a 401(k) plan buy “qualifying employer securities”, which is defined as stock of a “C” Corporation. This is the reason why one cannot use a self-directed IRA LLC to invest in a business the IRA holder or a disqualified person will be personally involved in or why a 401(k) plan cannot invest in an LLC in which the plan participant or disqualified person will be involved in without triggering the prohibited transaction rules.

So How Does the ROBS Solution Work?

The structure typically involves the following sequential steps:

1. An entrepreneur or existing business owner establishes a new C Corporation;

2. The C Corporation adopts a prototype 401(k) plan that specifically permits plan participants to direct the investment of their plan accounts into a selection of investment options, including employer stock, also known as “qualifying employer securities.”

3. The entrepreneur elects to participate in the new 401(k) plan and, as permitted by the plan, directs a rollover or trustee-to-trustee transfer of retirement funds from another qualified retirement plan into the newly adopted 401(k) plan;

4. The entrepreneur then directs the investment of his or her 401(k) plan account to purchase the C Corporation’s newly issued stock at fair market value ( i.e., the amount that the entrepreneur wishes to invest in the new business); and finally

5.The C Corporation utilizes the proceeds from the sale of stock to purchase an existing business or to begin a new venture.

What Are Some of the Advantages of the ROBS Solution?

  • Save Money: The primary advantage of establishing a ROBS solution is to be able to use your retirement funds to invest in a business you will be personally involved in without having to pay tax the retirement funds you wish to use as a distribution to tax and potentially penalty. By being able to invest the retirement funds into the business without having to take a taxable distribution and a 10% early distribution penalty if under the age of 591/2, using a ROBS solution could save someone close to 45% of the distribution amount. For example, if someone under the age of 591/2 was looking to use $100,000 of retirement funds to fund a business and ended up taking a taxable distribution of that amount, that individual would likely have to pay approximately 45% of the 100,000 or $45,000 in tax to the IRS when declaring the distribution on their tax return. The tax rate could be lower if the individual was in a lower income tax bracket or the retirement funds needed were insignificant, but using a ROBS solution would save having to pay tax and potentially a 10% penalty on that amount.
  • Invest in Yourself: The ROBS solution allows one to invest their retirement funds in a business that will be actively run by the retirement account holder. As a result, one is essentially investing their retirement funds in themselves rather than on Wall Street. Of course, not all businesses are successful. According to Bloomberg, close to 80% of new businesses fail in the first 18 months. Hence, investing your hard earned retirement funds in a new business is certainly a risk. However, it is a risk that you are legally entitled to take as per the Internal Revenue Code. Using retirement funds to invest in your business is not for everyone, but for those entrepreneurs that would rather invest in themselves than Wall Street, the ROBS solution is an option.
  • Diversification: There is a growing sentiment among financial advisors, especially after the 2008 financial crisis, that in order to protect your retirement funds from a market downturn, your retirement funds should be well diversified. One can generally not eliminate investment risk completely, but one can manage your level of risk. Every investment has some amount of risk, however, having your retirement funds invested in different types of investments, such as stocks, real estate, and even private businesses, can be a way of diversifying your retirement portfolio and better protecting your retirement funds. Also, it is believed that diversification can enable a retirement portfolio to grow both when markets boom and returns crumble in one sector One should certainly work with a financial planner and tax professional when looking at investment options, especially when it comes to using retirement funds to buy a business.
  • Earn a Salary: In order for one to be a participant of a 401(k) Plan, one needs to be an employee of the business, which adopted the plan. This is the reason why if you own Apple or IBM stock but don’t work at those companies, you cannot participate in their company 401(k) plans. Hence, in order to be eligible to participate in the corporation 401(k) plan you must become a W-2 employee of the C Corporation. For many entrepreneurs the ability to earn a salary and be actively involved in the business is the reason they are using a ROBS solution versus using a self-directed IRA.
  • Benefit from having a 401(k) Retirement Plan: One of the best ways for you to save toward your own retirement and ensure your future security is through an employer-sponsored 401(k) plan. Below are some of the advantages of offering and participating ion a 401(k) Plan.
  • Matching Contributions Many employers will match a portion of your savings: It’s like passing up free money if you don’t participate. A safe harbor 401(k) Plan, which is a popular type of 401(k) plan for small businesses, offer employees who participate in the plan a 3% matching contribution made by the employer. Thus, for example, if the employee earns $40,000 in salary during the year and contributes 3% of the salary of $1200 to the 401(k) plan, the employer would contribute an additional $1200 (3% of the salary) to the individual 401(k) plan account.
  • Retaining employees: with most businesses offering their employees retirement benefits, it is worthwhile for small businesses to compete for talented workers by implementing 401(k) benefits. Offering 401(k) plan benefits is a great way to retain key employees. In general, when potential hires are considering multiple job offers, they’ll compare those offers based on corporate culture, growth opportunities, and benefits packages. –
  • Easy Administration: 401(k) Plan administration is now easier and more cost-effective than ever with Internet options available to small employers. In addition, IRA Financial Group offers recordkeeping and third-party administration services for your plan allowing you to spend more time focusing on your business and less on your plan.
  • You Can Participate As Well: You are eligible to participate in the company 401(k) plan if you are an owner or an employee of the company that sponsor’s the 401(k) plan. Current regulations allow plan participants to contribute up to $18,000 ($24,000 if over the age of 50) of their income on a pre-tax basis each year. That means that in addition to your tax savings for offering the plan and providing matching contributions, you’ll receive yet another tax savings for participating in the plan. This savings can be substantial – an owner in the 35% tax bracket who made the maximum contribution would have saved approximately $6,500 in taxes in 2016.

To learn more about the benefits of the ROBS strategy, please contact a retirement tax expert at 800-472-0646.

IRA Financial Group Facebook pageIRA Financial Group Twitter pageamazon-logoIRA Financial Group Tumblr pageIRA Financial Group Pinterest page

Feb 07

The Basics of Flipping Houses with a Solo 401k

Since the creation of the Solo 401(K) Plan back in the early 1980s, the IRS has always permitted a Solo 401(K) Plan to purchase, hold, or flip real estate.  By using a Solo 401(K) Plan, also known as a self-directed 401(K) Plan or Individual 401(K) Plan, to buy real estate, you will be able to purchase raw land, domestic or foreign real estate, residential or commercial property, flip homes, and much more tax-free and without requiring custodian consent!

Flipping a Home is as Simple as Writing a Check

With a Solo 401(K) Plan, flipping homes or engaging in a real estate transaction is as simple as writing a check. As trustee of your Solo 401(K) Plan, you will have the authority to make real estate investment decisions on behalf of your 401(K) Plan on your own without needing the consent of a custodian. One of the true advantages of a Solo 401(K) Plan is that when you want to purchase a home with your Solo 401(K) Plan, you can make the purchase, pay for the improvements, and even sell or flip the property on your own without involving the custodian or any third-party.  It's Time To Let 401(k) Holders Invest Like the ProsIn other words, with a Solo 401(K) Plan, you will have the power to flip homes or do multiple real estate transactions on your own without requiring the consent of a custodian. One additional important advantage of purchasing real estate with a Solo 401(K) Plan is that all income and gains are tax-deferred until a distribution is taken (distributions are not required until the 401(K) Plan participant turns 70 1/2). In the case of a Roth Solo 401(K) Plan, all gains are tax-free.

Flip a Home without Requiring the Consent of a Custodian

A Solo 401(K) Plan is the most efficient and cost effective vehicle for doing house flips with retirement funds.  With a Solo 401(K) Plan, you will be able to use your 401(K) funds to purchase real estate and engage in flipping homes tax-free and without custodian consent.  A traditional 401(K) Plan custodian (financial institution) will not allow you to purchase real estate using your retirement funds.  Therefore, in order to have the ability to engage in house flipping transactions using retirement funds, a Solo 401(K) Plan is the answer.

Control the Entire House Flipping Transaction

Unlike a conventional 401(K) Plan which requires custodian consent and requires high custodian fees, a Solo 401(K) Plan will allow you to buy real estate by simply writing a check.  With a traditional custodian controlled Solo 401(K) Plan, you will have total control to make a real estate purchase, pay for improvements, and then sell the property without ever talking to the custodian.  Since all your 401(K) funds will be held at a local bank in the name of the Solo 401(K) Plan, all you would need to do to engage in a house flipping transaction is write a check straight from the Solo 401(K) Plan account or simply wire the funds from the Solo 401(K) Plan bank account.  No longer would you need to ask a custodian for permission or have a custodian sign the real estate transaction documents.  Instead, with a self-directed Solo 401(K) Plan, as trustee of the Solo 401(K) Plan, you will be able to execute the real estate transaction by simply writing a check.

Use a Solo 401(K) Plan and Flip a Home Tax-Free

One major advantage of flipping homes with a Solo 401(K) Plan is that all gains are tax-deferred until a distribution is taken (distributions are not required until the IRA owner turns 70 1/2). In the case of a Roth Solo 401(K) Plan, all gains are tax-free. In other words, all gains attributable to the house flipping transaction will flow back to your Solo 401(K) Plan tax-free!

IRA Financial Group will take care of setting up your entire Solo 401(K) Plan structure. The whole process can be handled by phone, email, fax, or mail and typically takes between 2-10 days to complete, the timing largely depending on the existing custodian holding your retirement funds. Our 401(K) Plan experts and tax and ERISA professionals are onsite greatly reducing the setup time and cost.

The IRA Financial Group was founded by a group of top law firm tax and ERISA lawyers who have worked at some of the largest law firms in the United States, such as White & Case LLP, Dewey & LeBoeuf LLP, and Thelen LLP.

To learn more about the advantages of using a Solo 401(K) Plan to purchase real estate and flip homes tax-free, please call a Solo 401(K) Expert at 800-472-0646 or visit www.irafinancialgroup.com.

IRA Financial Group Facebook pageIRA Financial Group Twitter pageamazon-logoIRA Financial Group Tumblr pageIRA Financial Group Pinterest page

Feb 02

How Do You Take a Solo 401(k) Loan?

As long as the plan documents allow for it & the proper loan documents are prepared and executed, a participant loan can be made for any reason. The Solo 401(k) loan is received tax free and penalty free. There are no penalties or taxes due provided loan payments are paid on time. The IRA Financial Group Solo 401(k) Plan documents will allow you to use a loan from your Solo 401(k) for any investment purposes, including real estate, funding your business or a new business, tax liens, private placements, etc.

What is a Solo 401(k) Plan Loan?

A Solo 401(k) loan is permitted at any time using the accumulated balance of the Solo 401(k) as collateral for the loan. A Solo 401(k) participant can borrow up to $50,000 or 50% of their account value – whichever is less. This loan has to be repaid over an amortization schedule of 5 years or less with payment frequency no greater than quarterly. The interest rate must be set at a reasonable rate of interest, generally interpreted as prime rate as per the Wall Street Journal. As of 1/1/17 prime rate is 3.75%, which means participant loans may be set at a very reasonable Interest rate. The Interest rate is fixed based on the prime rate at the time of the loan application.

How Do You Take a Solo 401(k) Loan?How Can This be Done?

Internal Revenue Code Section 72(p) and the 2001 EGGTRA rules allow a Solo 401(k) Plan participant to borrow money from the plan tax-free and without penalty. As long as the plan documents allow for it and the proper loan documents are prepared and executed, a participant loan can be made for any reason. The solo 401(k) loan is received tax-free and penalty-free. There are no penalties or taxes due provided loan payments are paid on time. The IRA Financial Group Solo 401(k) Plan documents will allow you to use a loan from your Solo 401(k) for any investment purposes, including real estate, funding your business or a new business, tax liens, private placements, etc. Our in-house retirement tax professionals will assist you in completing the Solo 401(k) Plan documents in a timely manner once your Solo 401(k) Plan has been adopted.

When can a Participant Loan be Useful?

As a result of the recent economic meltdown, banks and other financial institutions have severely limited their lending capacity to self-employed business owners, thus, causing grave financial pressure on self-employed business owners. The Solo 401(k) plan is a perfect structure for any self-employed business owner seeking immediate funds for their business or to help pay personal expenses. Solo 401(k) participants can borrow up to $50,000 or 50% of their account value, whichever is less, to help finance or operate their business. For example, an individual can take a Solo 401(k) Plan loan and use those funds to pay off a mortgage, credit card, any personal expense, go on vacation, or start and finance a business.

Please contact one of our 401(k) Experts at 800-472-0646 for more information.

IRA Financial Group Facebook pageIRA Financial Group Twitter pageamazon-logoIRA Financial Group Tumblr pageIRA Financial Group Pinterest page

Jan 30

Why You Should Go Roth with Your Solo 401k

The Roth Solo 401K Plan is the ultimate tax-free retirement solution for the self-employed. With federal and state income tax rates expected to increase in the future, gaining the ability to generate tax-free returns from your retirement investments when you retire is the last surviving legal tax shelter. With a Roth Solo 401K you can make almost any investment tax-free, including real estate, tax liens, precious metals, currencies, options, and private business investments and once you hit the age of 59 1/2 you will be able to live off your Roth 401K assets without ever paying tax. Imagine if someone told you that if you started making Roth 401K contributions in your forties and by just generating a modest rate of return, you could have over a million dollars tax-free when you retire. With a Roth 401K, live off the Roth 401K investment income tax-free or take a portion of your Roth 401K funds and use it for any purpose without ever paying tax.

The Roth Solo 401K Plan Advantages

Power of Tax-Free Investing: One of the main attractions to the self-directed Roth Solo 401(k) plan is based on the fact that qualified distributions of Roth earnings are tax-free. As long as certain conditions are met and the distribution is a qualified distribution, the Roth solo 401(k) plan participant will never pay tax on any Roth distributions received. The advantage of contributing to a Roth solo 401(k) plan is that income and gains generated by the Roth 401(k) investment can be tax-free and penalty-free so long as certain requirements are satisfied. Unlike with a pre-tax solo 401(k) plan contributions, contributions to a Roth solo 401(k) are not tax deductible.

Why You Should Go Roth with Your Solo 401kThe power of tax-free investing can be best illustrated by way of the following examples:

Example 1: Joe, a self-employed consultant began funding a Roth solo 401(k) plan with $3,000 per year at age 20 and would continue on through age 65. At age 65 Joe would wind up with $2.5 million at retirement (assuming they earn the long-run annual compound growth rate in stocks, which was 9.88 percent from 1926 to 2011). Not a bad result for investing only $3,000 a year.

Example 2: Ben, a self-employed real estate agent, who is 30 years began funding a Roth solo 401(k) plan with $8000 and wanted to know how much he would have at age 70 if he continued to make $8000 annual contributions and was able to earn at an 8% rate of return. Ben did some research and was astonished that at age 70 he would have a whopping $ 2,238,248 tax-free which he can then live off or pass to his wife or children tax-free.

Example 3: Mary, a self-employed real estate investor, who is 35 years began funding a Roth solo 401(k) plan with $13000 and wanted to know how much she would have at age 70 if she continued to make $13000 annual contributions and was able to earn at a 10% rate of return, which she felt was possible based off her past real estate investment returns. Mary did some research and was astonished that at age 70 she would have a whopping $ 3,875,649 tax-free which she could then live off or pass to her husband and children tax-free.

I am sure it may be hard for some of you to comprehend that putting away just a few thousand dollars a year in a Roth Solo 401(k) plan can leave you with millions of dollars tax-free. It’s as simple as making annual contributions to your Roth Solo 401(k) Plan and then generating tax-free returns from making real estate or other investments with your solo 401(k) plan.

High Contributions: A Roth Solo 401(k) combines features of the traditional 401(k) with those of the Roth IRA. Like a Solo 401K Plan, the Roth Solo 401K Plan is perfect for any self-employed individual or small business owner with no employees. The Roth Solo 401K Plan contains the same advantages of a Solo 401(k) Plan, but as with a Roth IRA, contributions are made with after-tax dollars. While you don’t get an upfront tax-deduction, the Roth 401K account grows tax-free, and withdrawals taken during retirement aren’t subject to income tax, provided you’re at least 59 1/2 and you’ve held the account for five years or more.

The Roth Solo 401(k) can offer advantages to self-employed individuals who wish to maximize their ability to generate tax-free retirement savings while receiving the ability to invest in real estate, precious metals, private businesses or funds tax-free and without custodian consent.

Unlike a Roth IRA, which limits individual Roth IRA contributions to $5,500 annually ($6,500 if the individual is 50 years or older), in 2017, with a Roth Solo 401(k) account, an individual can make Roth (after-tax) contributions of up to $18,000, or $24,000 for those 50 or older by the end of the year — allowing individuals to stock away thousands of dollars more in tax-free retirement income than they would through a Roth IRA.

A Roth Solo 401(k) is perfect for sole proprietors, small businesses and independent contractors such as consultants. The Roth Solo 401(k) plan is unique and so popular because it is considered the last remaining legal tax shelter available. There are so many features of the Roth Solo 401(k) plan that make it so appealing and popular among self-employed business owners.

Unlimited Investment Opportunities: With a Roth 401(k) Plan or Roth 401(k) plan sub-account, you can invest your after-tax Roth 401(k) Plan funds in real estate, precious metals, tax liens, private business investments, and much more tax-free! Unlike with a pre-tax 401(k) Plan, with a Roth 401(k) account, all income and gains would flow back tax-free to your account. As long as you have reached the age of 59 1/2 and have had the Roth 401(k) account opened at least five years, you can take Roth 401(k) Plan distributions tax-free. In other words, you can live off your Roth 401(k) Plan assets or income tax-free. With federal income tax rates expected increase, the ability to have a tax-free source of income upon retirement may be the difference between retiring early or not.

Loan Feature: While an IRA offers no participant loan feature, the Roth Solo 401k allows participants to borrow up to $50,000 or 50% of their account value (whichever is less) for any purpose at a low interest rate (the lowest interest rate is Prime which is 3.75% as of 1/1/17). This offers a Roth Solo 401(k) Plan participant the ability to access up to $50,000 to use for any purpose, including paying personal debt or funding a business.

Offset the Cost of Your Plan with a Tax Deduction: By paying for your Solo 401(k) with business funds, you would be eligible to claim a deduction for the cost of the plan, including annual maintenance fees. The deduction for the cost associated with the Solo 401(k) Plan and ongoing maintenance will help reduce your business’s income tax liability, which will in-turn offset the cost of adopting a self-directed Solo 401(k) Plan. The retirement tax professionals at the IRA Financial Group will help you take advantage of the available business tax deduction for adopting a Solo 401(k) Plan.

Cost Effective Administration: In general, the Roth solo 401(k) plan is easy to operate. There is generally no annual filing requirement unless your solo 401(k) plan exceeds $250,000 in assets, in which case you will need to file a short information return with the IRS (Form 5500-EZ).

Exemption from UDFI: When an IRA buys real estate that is leveraged with mortgage financing, it creates Unrelated Debt Financed Income (“UDFI”) – a type of Unrelated Business Taxable Income (also known as “UBTI” or “UBIT”) on which taxes must be paid. The UBTI tax is approximately 40% for 2017. Whereas, with a Roth Solo 401(k) plan, you can use leverage without being subject to the UDFI rules and UBTI tax. This exemption provides significant tax advantages for using a Roth Solo 401(k) Plan versus an IRA to purchase real estate.

To learn more about the Roth Solo 401(k) Plan, please contact a 401(k) expert at 800-472-0646.

IRA Financial Group Facebook pageIRA Financial Group Twitter pageamazon-logoIRA Financial Group Tumblr pageIRA Financial Group Pinterest page

Jan 26

Solo 401k Plans Offer Asset and Creditor Protection

Retirement accounts have become many Americans’ most valuable assets. That means it is vital that you have the ability to protect them from creditors, such as people who have won lawsuits against you.

In general, the asset/creditor protection strategies available to you depend on the type of retirement account you have (i.e. Traditional IRA, Roth IRA, or 401(k) qualified plan, etc.), your state residency, and whether the assets are yours or have been inherited.

Federal Protection for 401(k) Plan Qualified Plan for Bankruptcy

Effective for bankruptcies filed after October 17, 2005, the following rules give protection to a debtor’s retirement funds in bankruptcy by way of exempting them from the bankruptcy estate. The general exemption found in sec­tion 522 of the Bankruptcy Code, 11 U.S.C. §522, pro­vides an unlimited exemption for retirement assets ex­empt from taxation for Section 401(a) (tax qualified retirement plans—pen­sions, profit-sharing and section 401(k) plans). Thus, ERISA qualified plans as well as Solo 401(k) plans are afforded full bankruptcy exemption. What this means is that if a participant of a 401(k) Plan declares bankruptcy, his or her 401(k) plan assets will be exempt from the bankruptcy proceeding and could not be attached by the bankruptcy’s estates creditors.

Federal Protection for 401(k) Plan Qualified Plan Funds Outside of Bankruptcy

In the case of a debtor who is not under the ju­risdiction of the federal bankruptcy court but rath­er has become involved in a state law insolvency, enforcement, or garnishment proceeding, the 2005 Bankruptcy Act is inapplicable and the ERISA rules and state laws would govern.

Title I of ERISA requires that a pension plan provide that benefits under the plan may not be assigned or alienated; i.e., the plan must provide a contractual “anti‑alienation” clause. For the anti-alienation clause to be effec­tive, the underlying plan must constitute a “pension plan” under ERISA. Such a plan is any “plan, fund or program which…provides retirement income to employees.” ERISA §3(2)(A).. Therefore, a plan that does not benefit any common-law employee is not an ERISA pension plan. As a result, a Solo 401(k) Plan is not treated as an ERISA Plan.

In addition to the ERISA protection, the Internal Revenue Code Section 401(a)(13(A) provides that “[a] trust shall not constitute a qualified trust under this section unless the plan of which such trust is a part provides that benefits provided under the plan may not be assigned or alienated. Thus, a retirement plan will not attain qualified status unless it precludes both volun­tary and involuntary assignments.

Note – neither ERISA nor Code protections apply to assets held under individual retirement arrange­ments, simplified employee pension plans, govern­ment plans, or most church plans.

Furthermore, ERISA sec­tion 514(a) provides that ERISA supersedes state laws insofar as such laws relate to employee benefit plans. The ERISA anti-alienation and preemption provisions combine to make state attachment and garnishment laws inapplicable to an individual’s benefits under an ERISA-covered employee ben­efit plan.

Exceptions

There are a number of exceptions to ERISA’s and the Code’s anti‑alienation provisions:

1. Qualified domestic relations orders (“QDROs”), as defined in Internal Revenue Code Section 414(p), may be exempted (Internal Revenue Code §401(a)(13)(B); ERISA §206(d)(3)). This means that retirement plan assets are a marital asset sub­ject to division in divorce and attachment for child support.

2. Up to 10 percent of any benefit in pay status may be voluntarily and revocably assigned or alienated (Internal Revenue Code §401(a)(13)(A); Treas. Reg. §1.401(a)-13(d)(1); ERISA §206(d)(2)).

3. A participant may direct the plan to pay a ben­efit to a third party if the direction is revocable and the third party files acknowledgment of lack of en­forceability (Treas. Reg. §1.401(a)-13(e)).

4. Federal tax levies and judgments are exempt­ed. The Treasury Regulations under Code section 401(a)(13) provide that plan benefits are subject to attachment by the IRS in common law and com­munity property states.

In addition to the statutory exceptions noted above, several court decisions have held that an individual’s retirement plan benefits may be sub­ject to attachment for federal criminal penalties or restitution arising from a crime

Solo 401(k) Plans

A debtor’s plan benefits under a pension, prof­it-sharing, or section 401(k) plan are generally safe from creditor claims both inside and outside of bankruptcy due to ERISA and the Code’s broad anti-alienation protections. However, case law and Department of Labor Regulations have held that such a plan that benefits only an owner (and/or an owner’s spouse) are not ERISA plans, thus voiding the anti-alienation protections generally afforded to ERISA plans. Thus, state law will govern the protection afforded to Solo 401(k) Plans outside the bankruptcy context.

State Law Protection of Solo 401(k) Plan Assets Outside of Bankruptcy

Because case law and Department of Labor Regulations have held that such a plan that benefits only an owner (and/or an owner’s spouse) are not ERISA plans, thus voiding the anti-alienation protections generally afforded to ERISA plans, state law will govern the protection afforded to Solo 401(k) Plans outside the bankruptcy context.

Please click here for a table that will provide a summary of state protection afforded to Solo 401(k) Plans from creditors outside of the bankruptcy context.

Asset Protection Planning

The different federal and state creditor protection afforded to 401(k) qualified plans and IRS inside or outside the bankruptcy context presents a number of important asset protection planning opportunities.

If, for example, you have left an employer where you had a qualified plan, rolling over assets from a qualified plan, like a 401(k), into an IRA may have asset protection implications. For example, if you live in or are moving to a state where IRAs are not protected from creditors or have in excess of $1million dollars in plan assets and are contemplating bankruptcy, you would likely be better off leaving the assets in the company qualified plan.

Note – If you plan to leave at least some of your IRA to your family, other than your spouse, the assets may not be protected from your beneficiaries’ creditors, depending on where the beneficiaries live. IRA assets left to a spouse would likely receive creditor protection if the IRA is re-titled in the name of the spouse. However, you will likely be able to protect your IRA assets that you plan on leaving to your family, other than your spouse, by leaving an I.R.A. to a trust. To do that, you must name the trust on the IRA custodian Designation of Beneficiary Form on file.

The Solo 401(k) Asset & Creditor Protection Solution

By having and maintaining a Solo 401(k) Plan, the people to whom you owe money – as a result of normal debt, bankruptcy or a civil court judgment – will likely not be able to reach your Solo 401(k) assets to satisfy the debt. However, Solo 401(k) Plan assets are not federally protected from divorce settlements or federal tax liens. As illustrated above, most states will afford Solo 401(k) Plans full protection from creditors outside of the bankruptcy context.

Please contact one of our Solo 401(k) Experts at 800-472-0646 for more information.

IRA Financial Group Facebook pageIRA Financial Group Twitter pageamazon-logoIRA Financial Group Tumblr pageIRA Financial Group Pinterest page

Jan 24

IRS Tax Treatment When Using a Solo 401(k) to Invest in Bitcoin

Bitcoin is usually described as virtual currency. That’s useful shorthand, but is it really money? And should it be taxed as if it is? Or is it a capital asset? How about a commodity? Or what about a collectible? Most commentators have viewed bitcoins either as a virtual type of currency or capital asset. However, the potential still exists that the IRS could argue that bitcoins do not satisfy the main functions of money and acts more like a stamp or other collectible than a currency.

IRS Tax Treatment When Using a Solo 401(k) to Invest in BitcoinIn Notice 2014-21, the IRS stated that it would tax digital money such as bitcoin like property, not currency. On March 25, 2014, the IRS issued Notice 2014-21, which for the first time set forth the IRS position on the taxation of bitcoins. According to the IRS, “Virtual currency is treated as property for U.S. federal tax purposes,” the notice said. “General tax principles that apply to property transactions apply to transactions using virtual currency.” By treating bitcoins as property and not currency, the IRS is providing a potential boost to investors but it is also imposing extensive record-keeping rules—and significant taxes—on its use. In a notice, the IRS said that it generally would treat bitcoin held by investors much like stock or other intangible property. If the virtual currency is held for investment, any gains would be treated as capital gains, meaning they could be subject to lower tax rates. The top long-term capital gains tax rate is 20%, while the top ordinary income-tax rate is 39.6%, although add-on taxes often make both rates somewhat higher. But as capital investments, loss deductions from bitcoin often would be limited, whereas currency losses can be easier to deduct up front.

The IRS guidance in Notice 2014-21 targets a new crop of digital currencies used by a small number of merchants, consumers and investors. Bitcoin, the best-known of the group, is created using a computer process and can be exchanged for dollars online.

Although IRS Notice 2014-21 did not address whether bitcoins would be considered an approved investment for retirement purposes, the fact that the Notice is treating bitcoins as property, like stock, and not as a collectible, it should be clear bitcoin is an approved investment for 401(k) plans and would not violate IRC 408(m).

For many retirement investors, the investment in bitcoins via a Solo 401(k) plan could prove a very tax efficient manner for transacting with bicoins as use of bitcoin in a retail transaction typically would be a taxable “event” for many buyers, requiring them to figure out the gain they had made on the virtual currency—and eventually pay tax on it, whereas, the gains would likely not be subject to tax with retirement funds. However, the IRS stated in the Notice that bitcoin “miners”—including people who use computers to validate bitcoin transactions or maintain transaction ledgers—also would be subject to tax on payments received in bitcoin and that “mining” that constitutes a trade or business would be subject to self-employment taxes. Accordingly, dealers in bitcoin—much like dealers in other types of property—would be subject to different tax principles than individual investors, and their gains generally would be taxed as ordinary income.

Notice 2014-21 is important because it sets forth some clarity by the IRS about the tax treatment of virtual currencies, but it also raised new questions, such as what government body would be in charge of regulation.

With IRA Financial Group’s self-directed retirement plans, retirement account investors have the ability to make traditional as well as alternative asset investments, such as real estate and bitcoins, in a tax-deferred or tax-free basis.

Why Work With the IRA Financial Group?

The IRA Financial Group was founded by a group of top law firm tax and ERISA lawyers who have worked at some of the largest law firms in the United States, such as White & Case LLP, Dewey & LeBoeuf LLP, and Thelen LLP. Over the years, we have helped thousands of clients establish IRS compliant Solo 401(k) solutions. With our work experience at some of the largest law firms in the country, our retirement tax professionals’ tax and IRA knowledge in this area is unmatched.

To learn more about using a “Checkbook Control” Solo 401(k) to make bitcoin and other investments without tax, please contact one of our Solo 401(k) Experts at 800-472-0646 for more information.

IRA Financial Group Facebook pageIRA Financial Group Twitter pageamazon-logoIRA Financial Group Tumblr pageIRA Financial Group Pinterest page

Jan 22

The Basics About Form 5500s

The following is an article from plansponsor.com featuring insight from our own Adam Bergman –

What the DOL and IRS want to know about your retirement plan

Every retirement plan governed by the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA), regardless of size, needs to file a Form 5500 with the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), says Richard Rausser, senior vice president of client services at Pentegra Retirement Services in White Plains, New York.

Although plans only need to file one document, the IRS shares these forms with the Department of Labor (DOL), he says.

The form is due seven months after the end of the plan year, says Jim Vanburen, a director in the human capital services practice at Grant Thornton LLP in Albany, New York. Thus, if a plan’s calendar year ends on December 31, it is due July 31, Vanburen says. Should a plan need additional time to complete the form, they can file a Form 5558 for a 2-1/2-month extension, as long as the form for the extension is filed before the original Form 5500 deadline, he says.

It is important for retirement plan advisers and sponsors to realize that the purpose of these forms is merely to gather basic information about a plan, as opposed to being a tax return, notes Adam Bergman, a senior tax attorney with IRA Financial Group in New York. That is, undoubtedly, why the IRS audited only 8,706, or less than 1%, of the 908,000 Form 5500s that it processed in 2014, he says.

The Basics About Form 5500sA plan’s recordkeeper or third-party administrator typically fill out the forms, according to Vanburen and  Mark Klein, CEO of PCS, a recordkeeper in Philadelphia. However, “the form is signed by the plan administrator under penalty of perjury, so sponsors and their advisers can and should verify the accuracy of the form before it is filed,” Klein says. “To verify the information and confirm accuracy, sponsors and their advisers should review the completed form against the plan’s trust report, employer census information, plan document and other plan information.”

Michael Savage, retirement services compliance manager for Paychex in Rochester, New York, says that errors that are typically found on Form 5500 “include participant counts, beginning asset balance, employer tax ID numbers, financial reconciliations with prior plan years and missing service providers on Schedule C.”

What does the Form 5500 ask plans about? “The Form 5500 requires information regarding the number of participants, financial information about the assets held in the plan and the service providers involved with the plan,” Rausser says. In other words, Savage says: “current value of assets, liabilities, contributions, fees, transfers, changes in net assets during the plan year and participant count.”

“The Form 5500 is the primary source of information about the operations, funding and investments of private-sector, employment-based pension and welfare benefit plans in the U.S.” Rausser says. “The information is reported on various schedules attached to the Form 5500. In addition, if the plan covers 100 or more participants at the beginning of the plan year, the plan administrator must attach an audited financial report on the plan assets.”

Who uses the Form 5500? Not only is “the Form 5500 Series an important compliance, research and compliance tool for the DOL, [but it can serve as] a disclosure document for plan participants and beneficiaries, and a source of information and data for other Federal agencies, Congress and the private sector in assessing employee benefit, tax and economic trends and policies,” Rausser says. These forms are filed electronically and can be viewed on the DOL’s website, Vanburen adds. The information can be helpful for advisers looking to pitch new business or sponsors looking to benchmark their plan against those at companies of similar size or business.

For the DOL’s part, it has “become very savvy at data mining” the information, Vanburen says. The DOL “looks for certain patterns that would indicate that a plan is not compliant with IRS or DOL rules, and those data mining efforts have increased in the past seven to eight years.”

Savage adds: “DOL and IRS auditors conduct data mining searches to evaluate the overall health of the nation’s private sector retirement plans. Since employers are permitted to deduct the majority of their retirement plan’s contributions, the IRS utilizes Form 5500 data to substantiate this tax-qualification claim and proof of the plan’s compliance. The DOL also uses Form 5500 data to identify which areas of the country have employers offering retirement plans and their participation rates, and [both IRS and DOL] ERISA investigative units analyze Form 5500 data to identify trending plan errors in order to improve their future plan guidance and determine target areas when conducting plan audits.”

There are three types of Form 5500s, Bergman says. Those who are self-employed, have no employees and have $250,000 or more in plan assets are required to file a short form called Form 5500-EZ, which is submitted by mail, he says. These employers can file the form themselves, without having to hire a certified public accountant (CPA), he notes. In this sense, Bergman believes, “the IRS got it right by not forcing small businesses to spend thousands of dollars to get the information.”

Plans with fewer than 100 employees file the 5500 Short Form. Comprising three or four pages, it typically costs plans $1,500 to file, he says. The third form is the long Form 5500, which also asks for numerous schedule attachments, Bergman says. A more complicated form than the other two versions, it typically costs a company $5,000 to file.

On July 21, 2016, the DOL, IRS and Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation (PBGC) proposed changes to the Form 5500, effective for 2019 Forms that would be filed in 2020, Vanburen says. The report took up more than 700 pages, and laid out plans for five major goals, he says.

The first is to modernize Schedule H, the financial statement, with more detailed reporting on the types of assets that plans invest in, Vanburen notes. Second, instead of filing one Schedule C that lists all of a plan’s provider fees, a plan would have to file a separate Schedule C for “each service provider to allow a deeper dive into each of these relationships,” he says.

Third is to enhance the accessibility and usefulness of the data. Fourth, it would eliminate Form 5500-EZ and 5500 Short Form—requiring plans of all sizes to file the more detailed, long Form 5500.

Finally, Vanburen says, in an effort to improve compliance, the form would ask “more questions on plan operations and financial management. They are going to get more granular.”

“The bottom line,” he concludes, “is that as complex as these forms are currently, they will become even more complex in the coming years, so plan advisers and sponsors need to ensure that their service providers can capture all of the new types of data that are going to be required.”

For more information about IRS Form 5500, please contact us @ 800.472.0646.

IRA Financial Group Facebook pageIRA Financial Group Twitter pageamazon-logoIRA Financial Group Tumblr pageIRA Financial Group Pinterest page

Jan 17

If You Have Self-Employment Income, You Need a Solo 401k Plan

401k plans are defined in the Internal Revenue Code (Section 401) as retirement savings trusts. A 401(k) Plan is an IRS approved qualified retirement plan. As the name implies, the Solo 401(k) plan is an IRS approved qualified 401(k) plan designed for a self-employed individual or the sole owner-employee of a corporation. It works best when there are no other employees or a very small number of employees.

In 2001, the Economic Growth and Tax Relief Reconciliation Act (EGTRRA) was passed. This act clarified how a 401(k) could be used by a self employed person who has no full time employees. It also clarified that the self-employed 401(k) participant can make contributions as the role of employee and employer resulting in very high contribution limits.

To access these benefits an investor must meet two eligibility requirements:

1. The presence of self employment activity.

2. The absence of full-time employees.

A Solo 401(k) offers a self-employed business owner the ability to use his or her retirement funds to make virtually any type of investment on their own without requiring the consent of a custodian. The IRS only describes the type of investments that are prohibited, which are very few. In addition, a Solo 401(k) plan offers a high annual contribution limit (up to $60,000), allows you to borrow up to $50,000 for any purpose, and imposes no custodian fees.

The Advantages of Using a Solo 401(k)?

The Solo 401(k) plan offers most of the characteristics of the Self Directed IRA LLC, including having the ability to make almost any type of investments, including real estate, but without the need to establish an LLC or pay custodian fees.  The Solo 401(k) Plan is the most tax-advantageous retirement plan available because of its very high annual contribution limits. The Solo 401K plan also allows you to borrow money from your retirement funds (up to $50,000) and use the funds for any purpose, including help finance your business or pay personal bills.

Am I Eligible to use the Solo 401K Plan?

The Solo 401(k) plan may be used by any individual who is already a business owner or who will be establishing a business and does not have, or plan to have, full-time employees. The Solo 401(k) plan is perfect for independent contractors, such as consultants, home businesses and real estate agents. The owner’s spouse may also contribute to the plan as long as he or she is an employee of the business.

Use the Solo 401K Plan to Take out a Loan

One of the advantages of the Solo 401K plan is that it allows you to take out a loan from your retirement account. Under Internal Revenue Code Section 72(p), a Solo 401(k) Plan participant is permitted to borrow up to 50% of the total 401(k) value or $50,000 whichever is less tax-free for any reason. Repayment of the loan is based on a schedule provided when the loan is initiated and must be paid back into the account (including interest) over a term of up to five years. Loan payments must be made at least quarterly and at a minimum interest rate of Prime (as of 1/1/17, the Prime interest rate as per the Wall Street Journal is 3.75%). Failure to make the loan payments may cause a loan default causing taxes and IRS penalties.

For Real Estate Investors

Like the Self-Directed IRA LLC structure, the Solo 401K Plan offers participants the ability to invest in real estate tax-free! All income and gains generated by the investment will flow back to the 401(k) Plan tax-free!

In addition, in the case of an IRA using nonrecourse debt to finance a real estate purchase (only nonrecourse debt is permitted as recourse debt associated with an IRA investment would trigger a prohibited transaction), income or gains generally from the investment would trigger a penalty tax called the Unrelated Debt Financed Income (UDFI) tax. UDFI is a type of unrelated business taxable income which if triggered could subject the IRA to close to a 40% tax for 2017. However, a 401(k) Plan using nonrecourse financing for a real estate investment is exempt from the UDFI tax (Internal Revenue Code Section 514(c)(9).

How do I Initially fund the Solo 401K Plan?

Like the Self-Directed IRA LLC, to initially fund the Solo 401(k) you may rollover funds from Traditional IRAs, SEP Plans, previous employer 401(k) plans, Money Purchase plans, Profit Sharing plans, Keogh plans, Defined Benefit plans, 403(b) plans and Rollover IRAs tax-free! This is accomplished by setting up a Trust account for the Solo 401(k) and directly transferring the funds from the current Custodian to the trust bank account. The trust account can be opened at any local bank or credit union.

How much Money Can I Contribute to the Solo 401K Plan?

Under the 2017 Solo 401(k) contribution rules, a plan participant under the age of 50 can make a maximum employee deferral contribution in the amount of $18,000. That amount can be made in pre-tax or after-tax (Roth). On the profit sharing side, the business can make a 25% (20% in the case of a sole proprietorship or single member LLC) profit sharing contribution up to a combined maximum, including the employee deferral, of $54,000.

For plan participants over the age of 50, an individual can make a maximum employee deferral contribution in the amount of $24,000. That amount can be made in pre-tax or after-tax (Roth). On the profit sharing side, the business can make a 25% (20% in the case of a sole proprietorship or single member LLC) profit sharing contribution up to a combined maximum, including the employee deferral, of $60,000.

Calculate Your Solo 401k Plan Maximum Contribution Limit Please click here to calculate your Solo 401(k) Plan Maximum Contribution Limit.

The Trustee

For a Solo 401K plan, a Trustee must be designated to hold the assets of the retirement plan. In the case of the Solo 401(k), you are able to act as your own Trustee and are responsible for investing trust assets prudently and productively. In other words, as Trustee of the 401(k) Plan, you will have “Checkbook Control” over the Plan assets allowing you to make investments by simply writing a check from your 401(k) Trust account. As a result, the Solo 401(k) Plan is perfect for making real estate or tax lien investments. Note – The Trustee is prohibited from benefiting directly from the trust and cannot co-mingle personal funds with the trust or enter into a transaction with the trust.

Please contact one of our 401(k) Experts at 800-472-0646 for more information.

IRA Financial Group Facebook pageIRA Financial Group Twitter pageamazon-logoIRA Financial Group Tumblr pageIRA Financial Group Pinterest page