Dec 08

The Individual 401k Plan and UBIT Rules

One of the advantages of using retirement funds, such as a 401(k), Individual 401K or an IRA to make investments is that in most cases all income and gains from the investment will flow back to the Solo 401K tax-free. This is because a 401(k) is exempt from tax pursuant to Internal Revenue Code 401 and Section 512 of the Internal Revenue Codes exempt most forms of investment income generated by a 401(k) and a Solo 401K from taxation. Some examples of exempt type of income include: interest from loans, dividends, annuities, royalties, most rentals from real estate, and gains/losses from the sale of real estate.

The Individual 401k Plan and UBIT RulesHowever, the IRS enacted a set of rules in the 1950s in order to prevent charities and later 401(k) and IRAs from engaging in an active trade or business and, thus, having an unfair advantage because of their tax-exempt status. These rules can be found under Internal Revenue Code Sections 511-514 and have become known as the Unrelated Business Taxable Income rules or UBTI or UBIT. If the UBTI rules are triggered, the income generated from that activities will generally be subject to close to a 40% tax for 2016. Of note, a 401(k) or Solo 401K investing in an active trade or business using a C Corporation will not trigger the UBTI tax.

The UBTI generally applies to the taxable income of “any unrelated trade or business…regularly carried on” by an organization subject to the tax. The regulations separately treat three aspects of the quoted words—“trade or business,” “regularly carried on,” and “unrelated.”

Trade or Business: In defining “unrelated trade or business,” the regulations start with the concept of “trade or business” as used by Internal Revenue Code Section 162, which allows deductions for expenses paid or incurred “in carrying on any trade or business.”

Regularly Carried On: The UBIT only applies to income of an unrelated trade or business that is “regularly carried on” by an organization. Whether a trade or business is regularly carried on is determined in light of the underlying objective to reach activities competitive with taxable businesses. Short-term activities are exempted if comparable commercial activities of private enterprises are usually conducted on a year-round basis.

Before it can be determined whether an activity is seasonal or intermittent, the relevant activity must be identified and quantified, a step that is often troublesome.

Interestingly, unlike an IRA, using nonrecourse financing to purchase real estate will not trigger the UBIT/UBTI tax since it will not be treated as Unrelated Debt Financed Income or UDFI (exception exists for 401(k) qualified retirement plans but not IRAs under Internal Revenue Code Section 514(c)(9).

The type of income that generally could subject a 401(k) or Solo 401K to UBIT or UBTI is income generated from the following sources:

  • Income from the operations of an active trade or business through a passsthrough entity (i.e. LLC or partnership). For example, a store, restaurant, manufacturing business, real estate development company.
  • Using margin on a stock purchase.

For more information about the UBIT rules, please contact a Solo 401(k) Expert @ the IRA Financial Group @ 800.472.0646.

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Dec 06

Trump Tax Plan May Boost Attractiveness Of Rollover Business Start-Up Solution (ROBS)

This article originally appeared on Forbes.com

The subject of business taxes was a popular theme during President-elect Trump’s election campaign and will surely become a hot topic during his first year as president.  President-elect Trump has stated that he favors a 15% corporate rate as part of his tax plan as well as eliminate the corporate alternative minimum tax. This rate would be available to all businesses, both small and large, that want to retain the profits within the business.

When it comes to using retirement funds to invest in a business involving the retirement account holder or any of his or her lineal descendants (“disqualified persons”) there is generally only one legal way to do it and it involves the purchase of “C” corporation stock (qualifying employer securities) by a 401(k) qualified retirement plan.  The structure is known as a “rollover business start-up” or “ROBS”.

Trump Tax Plan May Boost Attractiveness Of Rollover Business Start-Up Solution (ROBS)The Internal revenue Code explicitly permits the purchase of corporate stock by a 401(k) qualified plan.  Nevertheless, the ROBS structure remains somewhat controversial. Although the Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”) has repeatedly confirmed its legality, it continues to be on the radar of the IRS and Department of Labor (DOL) due to a lack of compliance in some cases.

The ROBS arrangement typically involves rolling over a pre-tax IRA or 401(k) plan account into a newly established 401(k) plan, which is sponsored by a “C” corporation and then investing the rollover funds in the stock of the “C” corporation.  The individual retirement account holder can then earn a reasonable salary as an employee of the business.

The advantage of the ROBS solution is that it does allow one to use all their pre-tax IRA or 401(k) funds to buy a business that they will be involved in personally as an employee without tax or penalty.

The primary downside of the ROBS structure is the use of a C corporation as the business entity, an independent legal entity owned by shareholders. This means that the corporation itself, not the shareholders that own it, is held legally liable for the actions and debts the business incurs. Corporations are known to have double tax, first, when the company makes a profit, and then to the shareholder on their personal return when dividends are paid. The highest corporate income tax rate is currently at 35%. A sole proprietorship, LLC, or “S” Corporation is treated as a pass-through entity for tax purposes.  In other words, a “C” Corporation would impose two taxes on corporate earnings: a corporate level tax and a shareholder tax on the dividends received.

In comparison, for a pass-through entity, such as an LLC, the profits bypass taxation at the corporate level and are distributed and taxed at the owner’s level.  For example, assuming a corporate and personal income tax rate of 25%, a C Corporation earning $100 would be subject to a tax of 25% ($25) at the corporate level and then the individual shareholder would be subject to a tax of $18.75 on the dividend received ($75 dividend multiplied by a 25% tax rate) for an overall tax of  $43.75. In the case of an LLC, there would be no corporate tax rate and the individual member would be required to pay just $25 in taxes ($100 of allocated profits multiplied by a tax rate of 25%).  Therefore, clearly the use of a C Corporation has been a big reason why many individuals have walked away from using a ROBS solution to buy a business with retirement funds and have instead opted for a taxable distribution.  However, that may all change in 2017 and beyond.

A reduction in the corporate tax rate to 15% as President-elect Trump has promised would certainly make C Corporations a more attractive form of doing business from a tax standpoint than before and should make the ROBS solution a far more attractive option for people looking to use retirement funds to buy a business in 2017 and beyond.

For more information about using your retirement funds to start a business, please contact us @ 8900.472.0646.

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Dec 02

Using Your Solo 401k to Invest in Foreign Currencies, also known as Forex Trading

The foreign exchange market, also known as Forex, allows someone to exchange currencies around the world. Currency trading is one of the safest investments since fluctuations in the price of currency are very small (less than one cent per day). You can open and close positions in hours or hold them for as long as you want. Trading is done electronically and the market is open 24 hours a day for five and a half days. It is also the largest market in the world, much bigger than the stock exchange.

A Solo 401(k) gives you the ability to invest in currencies at your leisure. Solo 401(k) plans from traditional financial institutions do not usually let you trade currencies. They push their products on you (typically stocks, bonds, mutual funds). However, with a Checkbook Control Self-Directed Solo 401(k) plan from IRA Financial Group, you are not limited in your investment options. You have the ability to use your retirement funds any way you see fit, such as Forex trading.

Using Your Solo 401k to Invest in Foreign Currencies, also known as Forex TradingA Solo 401(k) is perfect for sole proprietors, small businesses and independent contractors. With a “checkbook control” Solo 401(k) Plan you will never have to seek the consent of a custodian to make an investment or be subject to excessive custodian account fees based on account value and per transaction.

By having “checkbook control” over your retirement funds you will gain the following advantages:

“Checkbook Control”: You’ll no longer have to get each investment approved by the custodian of your account. Instead, all decisions are truly yours. To make an investment, simply write a check and use the funds straight from your Solo 401(k) Plan bank account.

When making a real estate investment or purchasing tax liens, a “checkbook control” Solo 401(k) Plan, will allow you as manager of the LLC the ability to simply write a check from your Solo 401(k) Plan bank account.

No Custodian Fees or Transaction Fees: The most significant cost benefit of the Solo 401(k) plan is that it does not require the participant to hire a bank or trust company to serve as trustee. In other words, there are no custodian fees or transaction fees when establishing a Solo 401(k) Plan with the IRA Financial Group. This flexibility allows the participant to serve in the trustee role. This means that all assets of the 401(k) trust are under the sole authority of the Solo 401k participant. A Solo 401(k) plan allows you to eliminate the expense and delays associated with an IRA custodian, enabling you to act quickly when the right investment opportunity presents itself.

Speed: You can act quickly on a great investment opportunity. When you find an investment that you want to make with your retirement funds, simply write a check or wire the funds straight from your Solo 401(k) Plan bank account to make the investment. The Solo 401(k) Plan allows you to eliminate the delays associated with using an IRA custodian, enabling you to act quickly when the right investment opportunity presents itself.

Offset the Cost of Your Plan with a Tax Deduction: By paying for your Solo 401(k) with business funds, you would be eligible to claim a deduction for the cost of the plan, including annual maintenance fees. The deduction for the cost associated with the Solo 401(k) Plan and ongoing maintenance will help reduce your business’s income tax liability, which will in-turn offset the cost of adopting a self-directed Solo 401(k) Plan. The retirement tax professionals at the IRA Financial Group will help you take advantage of the available business tax deduction for adopting a Solo 401(k) Plan.

Cost Effective Administration: In general, the solo 401(k) plan is easy to operate. There is generally no annual filing requirement unless your Solo 401K plan exceeds $250,000 in assets, in which case you will need to file a short information return with the IRS (Form 5500-EZ).

IRA Financial Group does not advise you on investments you should or should not make. We do, however, give you the freedom to invest in what YOU want to invest in. For a thorough tutorial about Forex trading, check out this article on Investopedia to see if it’s right for you.

If you have any questions about the Solo 401(k) plan or how it works, please contact one of our 401(k) Experts @ 800.472.0646.

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Nov 30

What Are the Distribution Rules for a Roth Solo 401k?

The required distribution rules that force you to begin taking money out of your retirement plans and Traditional IRAs during your lifetime also apply to Roth Solo 401(k) Plans. The required distribution rules also force your beneficiaries to take distributions from the account after your death.

What Are the Distribution Rules for a Roth Solo 401k?Note: the rules for a Roth Solo 401(k) Plan are different from those for a Roth IRA. If you have a Roth Solo 401(k) plan, you must begin taking distributions from the account when you reach age 70 and 1/2, or after you retire, if that is later.

For more information about the Roth Solo 401(k), please contact the IRA Financial Group @ 800.472.0646.

 

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Nov 28

What Types of Maintenance Fees are Required for a Solo 401k Plan

The solo 401(k) plan is easy to operate. There is generally no annual filing requirement unless your Solo 401(k) Plan exceeds $250,000 in assets, in which case you will need to file a short information return with the IRS (Form 5500-EZ).

What Types of Maintenance Fees are Required for a Solo 401k Plan

Beyond this reporting requirement, basic reporting requirement ought to be maintained. This essentially means to keep all records, receipts, contracts relating to the Solo 401(k) and its investments on file.

Please contact one of our 401(k) Experts at 800-472-0646 for more information.

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Nov 22

How to Use a Loan From Your Solo 401k to Make an Investment

When it comes to using retirement funds, such as a Solo 401K Plan, to make investments, the question arises whether a Solo 401K Plan can utilize a loan as part of the transaction.

The IRS has always allowed a Solo 401K Plan to make traditional as well as non-traditional investments such as real estate. However, the prohibited transaction rules under Internal Revenue Code Section 4975 restrict a Solo 401(k) Plan participant from engaging in certain transactions – prohibited transactions. Under IRC 4975, one of the categories of prohibited transactions involve a disqualified person personally guaranteeing a loan made to a Solo 401K Plan. A Solo 401K plan participant is treated as a disqualified person pursuant to IRC 4975. As a result, a Solo 401K, also known as an Individual 401K or Self Directed 401K Plan, cannot use a recourse loan to purchase property owned by a Plan because a disqualified person (Solo 401K Plan participant) cannot personally guarantee a loan. However, the IRS does allow for the 401K to use a nonrecourse loan to purchase real estate. A nonrecourse loan is a loan that does not require a personal guarantee on the part of the Solo 401K plan participant. In other words, a loan that would limit a lender’s (bank) ability to go after an individual personally for non-payment of the loan. Instead, the lender’s sole remedy would be to look to the underlying property as satisfaction of the loan. Of course, this type of loan is more difficult to acquire and can be more expensive for a borrower.

In general, Internal Revenue Code Section 514(c)(9) permits a few types of exempt organizations to make debt-financed investments in real property without becoming taxable under Code Section 514. Note – the exemption only applies to real estate and not to other types of nonrecourse financing, such as margin on stock.

How to Use a Loan From Your Solo 401k to Make an InvestmentThe Section 514 exemption applies to any “qualified organization,” a term that includes (1) schools, colleges, universities, and their “affiliated support organizations,” (2) qualified pension, profit sharing, and stock bonus trusts, and (3) title holding companies exempt under § 501(c)(25). In general, indebtedness incurred by a qualified organization in acquiring or improving real property is not acquisition indebtedness if the transaction navigates through a long list of prohibitions. In other words, a Solo 401K Plan can use nonrecourse leverage when purchasing real property with Plan assets and not be subject to the Unrelated Debt-Financed Income rules, which in-turn trigger an Unrelated Business Taxable Income (UBTI or UBIT) tax (approximately 40% for 2016). Note – only nonrecourse leverage can be used when acquiring property by a 401K or Solo 401K Plan since, a disqualified person (401(k) plan participant or trustee) cannot personally guarantee the loan (recourse loan) since that would violate the prohibited transaction rules pursuant to Internal Revenue Code Section 4975. It is important to remember that this exemption would not apply to an IRA since an IRA is not a qualified pension, profit sharing, and stock bonus trusts.

To satisfy the exemption under Internal Revenue Code Section 514, the price paid by the organization for the property or improvement must be fixed when the property is acquired or the improvement is completed, neither the amount nor the due date of any payment under the indebtedness can be contingent on the revenue, income, or profits from the property, and the property may not be leased to the person who sold the property to the organization or to any person related to the seller within the meaning of Code Section 267(b) or Code Section 707(b). If the organization is a qualified pension, profit sharing, or stock bonus trust, the property may not be purchased from or leased to the employer of any of the employees covered by the trust or any one of several persons related to the employer. Financing for the property may not be received from the person who sold the property to the organization, a person related to the seller within the meaning of Code Section 267(b) or Code Section 707(b), or, if the organization is a qualified employee trust, an employer or related person who is disqualified from being seller or lessee under the rule described in the preceding sentence. The property must usually be owned directly by the qualified organization, except that an interest in a partnership or other pass-through entity qualifies if all of the partners or other owners are qualified organizations and each partner or other owner is allocated the same distributive share of every item of partnership income, deduction, and credit.

When § 514(c)(9) was enacted in 1980, it applied only to qualified pension, profit sharing, and stock bonus plans, but its scope was broadened in 1984 to include schools, colleges, and universities.

Many people ask why this exemption only applies to 401K Plans and not IRAs. The only reason given in the committee reports for the exemption is that some people wanted it: “Trustees of these plans are desirous of investing in real estate for diversification and to offset inflation. Debt-financing is common in real estate investments.”  The provision was originally limited to qualified employee trusts on the theory that the income would eventually be taxed to employees and their beneficiaries.

To learn more about the rules surrounding using a loan with a Solo 401K Plan to make an investment please contact a Solo 401K Expert at 800-472-0646.

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Nov 18

Should You Choose a Solo 401k or a SEP IRA?

A Solo 401(k) Plan is an IRS approved retirement plan, which is suited for business owners who do not have any employees, other than themselves and perhaps their spouse. The “one-participant 401(k) Plan” or Individual 401(k) Plan is not a new type of plan. It is a traditional 401(k) Plan covering only one employee.  Like a SEP IRA, a Solo 401(k) Plan offers the plan participant the ability to contribute up to $59,000 each year.  Before the Economic Growth and Tax Relief Reconciliation Act of 2001 (EGTRRA) became effective in 2002, there was no compelling reason for an owner-only business to establish a Solo 401(k) Plan because the business owner could generally receive the same benefits by adopting a profit sharing plan or a SEP IRA.  After 2002, EGTRRA paved the way for an owner-only business to put more money aside for retirement and to operate a more cost-effective retirement plan than a SEP IRA or 401(k) Plan.

There are a number of options that are specific to Solo 401(k) Plans that make the Solo 401(k) Plan a far more attractive retirement option for a self-employed individual than a SEP IRA.

1. Reach your Maximum Contribution Amount Quicker: A Solo 401(k) Plan includes both an employee and profit sharing contribution option, whereas, a SEP IRA is purely a profit sharing plan.

Under the 2016 Solo 401(k) contribution rules, a plan participant under the age of 50 can make a maximum employee deferral contribution in the amount of $18,000. That amount can be made in pre-tax or after-tax (Roth). On the profit sharing side, the business can make a 25% (20% in the case of a sole proprietorship or single member LLC) profit sharing contribution up to a combined maximum, including the employee deferral, of $53,000.

For plan participants over the age of 50, an individual can make a maximum employee deferral contribution in the amount of $24,000. That amount can be made in pre-tax or after-tax (Roth). On the profit sharing side, the business can make a 25% (20% in the case of a sole proprietorship or single member LLC) profit sharing contribution up to a combined maximum, including the employee deferral, of $59,000.

Whereas, a SEP IRA would only allows for a profit sharing contribution.  Hence, a participant in a SEP IRA would be limited to 25% (20% in the case of a sole proprietorship or single member LLC) profit sharing contribution up to a combined maximum of $53,000 for 2016. No employee deferral exists for a SEP IRA.

For example, Joe, who is 60 years old, owns 100% of an S Corporation with no full time employees.  Joe earned $100,000 in self-employment W-2 wages for 2016.  If Joe had a Solo 401(k) Plan established for 2016, Joe would be able to defer approximately $49,000 for 2016 (a $24,000 employee deferral, which could be pre-tax or Roth, and 25% of his compensation giving him $49,000 for the year).   Whereas, if Joe established a SEP IRA, Joe would only be able to defer approximately $25,000 (25% if his compensation) for 2016.

2. No catch-up Contributions: With a Solo 401(k) Plan you can make a contribution of up to $53,000 to the plan each tax year ($59,000 if the participant is over the age of 50).  However, with a SEP IRA, the maximum amount that can be deferred is $53,000 since a SEP IRA does not offer any catch-up contributions.

3. No Roth Feature: A Solo 401(k) plan can be made in pre-tax or Roth (after-tax) format.  Whereas, in the case of a SEP IRA, contributions can only be made in pre-tax format.  In addition, a contribution of $18,000 ($24,00, if the plan participant is over the age of 50) can be made to a Solo 401(k) Roth account.

4. Tax-Free Loan Option: With a Solo 401(k) Plan you can borrow up to $50,000 or 50% of your account value, whichever is less.  The loan can be used for any purpose.  With a SEP IRA, the IRA holder is not permitted to borrow even $1 dollar from the IRA without triggering a prohibited transaction.

5. Use Nonrecourse Leverage and Pay No Tax: With a Solo 401(k) Plan, you can make a real estate investment using nonrecourse funds without triggering the Unrelated Debt Financed Income Rules and the Unrelated Business Taxable Income (UBTI or UBIT) tax (IRC 514).  However, the nonrecourse leverage exception found in IRC 514 is only applicable to 401(k) qualified retirement plans and does not apply to IRAs. In other words, using a Self-Directed SEP IRA to make a real estate investment (Self-Directed Real Estate IRA) involving nonrecourse financing would trigger the UBTI tax.

6. Open the Account at Any Local Bank: With a Solo 401(k) Plan, the 401(k) bank account can be opened at any local bank or trust company.  However, in the case of a SEP or a Self-Directed IRA, a special IRA custodian is required to hold the IRA funds.

7. No Need for the Cost of an LLC: With a Solo 401(k) Plan, the plan itself can make real estate and other investments without the need for an LLC, which, depending on the state of formation, could prove costly. Since a 401(k) plan is a trust, the trustee on behalf of the trust can take title to a real estate asset without the need for an LLC.

8. Better Creditor Protection: In general, a Solo 401(k) Plan offers greater creditor protection than a SEP IRA.  The 2005 Bankruptcy Act generally protects all 401(k) Plan assets from creditor attack in a bankruptcy proceeding.  In addition, most states offer greater creditor protection to a Solo 401(k) qualified retirement plan than a SEP IRA outside of bankruptcy.

The Solo 401k plan is unique and so popular because it is designed explicitly for small, owner-only businesses.  The many features of the Solo 401(k) plan discussed above are why the Solo 401(k) Plan or Individual 401(k) Plan is so appealing and popular among self-employed business owners.

To learn more about the benefits of a Solo 401(k) Plan vs. a SEP IRA, please contact a tax professional at 800-472-0646.

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Nov 15

When Inheriting a Solo 401k, What Are my Options?

If you are a beneficiary (rather than the owner) of a qualified plan, such as a Solo 401(k), and receive a distribution as a result of the owner’s death, in general you have the following options:

  • Pay ordinary income tax: If plan assets are distributed to you, then you will have to report the distribution as income on your tax return. However, if you receive a distribution from a plan you inherited, you will not have to pay an early distribution tax, even if you are younger than 591/2. The penalty is waived for inherited plans.
  • Roll over the distribution: If you inherit a qualified plan and you were the spouse of the original owner, you can roll over the distribution into a traditional or Roth IRA. However, if you inherit a retirement plan, such as a 401(k) Plan, and you were not the spouse of the original owner, then you may roll over the plan assets into a traditional IRA only if you follow certain rules. For example, you may not roll over the assets into a plan or IRA that is in your own name (you must establish a new IRA that is titled in the name of the deceased with you as the designated beneficiary).
  • Convert to a Roth IRA: A spouse that inherits a retirement plan is provided virtually all of the distribution options offered to the deceased plan participant. Beginning in 2008, non-spouse beneficiaries also have the options to transfer the assets to a Roth IRA subject to certain rules.
  • Use ten-year averaging.

Please contact one of our 401(k) Experts at 800-472-0646 for more information.

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Nov 14

Trump Victory and Prospect of Reduced Corporate Tax Rates Expected To Increase Popularity of Rollover Business Start-Up Solution

Reduced corporate tax rates will help thousands of Americans use retirement funds tax-free to fund a business via ROBS

IRA Financial Group, a provider of Rollover Business Startup Solution (“ROBS”) solutions, expects to see a surge in the popularity of the ROBS solution based on Donald Trump’s Presidential Election victory. Mr. Trump’s tax plan has called for a reduction of tax rates on corporations.

Trump Victory and Prospect of Reduced Corporate Tax Rates Expected To Increase Popularity of Rollover Business Start-Up SolutionThe rollover business start-up (“ROBS”) arrangements typically involves rolling over a prior IRA or 401(k) plan account into a newly established 401(k) plan, which a start-up C Corporation business sponsored, and then investing the rollover 401(k) Plan funds in the stock of the new C Corporation. The funds are then deposited in the C Corporation bank account and are available for use for business purposes. The ROBS solution is a tax efficient way for any entrepreneur looking to use IRA fund to buy a business or franchise without incurring any tax or penalty from an IRA distribution. “With the expectation of reduced corporate tax rates, operating a business via a C Corporation will become more tax efficient and should increase the popularity of the ROBS solution with entrepreneurs looking to use retirement funds to buy a business,” stated Adam Bergman, a partner with the IRA Financial Group.

The IRA Financial Group was founded by a group of top law firm tax and ERISA lawyers who have worked at some of the largest law firms in the United States, such as White & Case LLP, Dewey & LeBoeuf LLP, and Thelen LLP.

IRA Financial Group is the market’s leading provider of self-directed IRA LLC “checkbook control” solutions. IRA Financial Group has helped thousands of clients take back control over their retirement funds while gaining the ability to invest in almost any type of investment, including real estate without custodian consent.

IRA Financial Group proudly announces the latest book titled written by tax partner Adam Bergman, Turning Retirement Funds into Start-Up Dreams – financing and retirement funding options for your start-up business is now available for purchase on Amazon.

To learn more about the IRA Financial Group please visit our website at http://www.irafinancialgroup.com or call 800-472-0646.

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Nov 10

IRA Financial Group’s Business Acquisition Compliance & Support Solution

With IRA Financial Group’s Business Acquisition & Compliance Solution Structure (BACSS) – you now can:

  • Use your retirement funds to invest in a new business tax-free!
  • Use your retirement funds to purchase a business or franchise tax-free!
  • Use your retirement funds to finance a new or existing business tax-free!
  • Earn a reasonable salary from your new or existing business.
  • Help grow your business.
  • Recapitalize and/or expand your business.
  • Maintain a qualified retirement plan and help save for the future.
  • Diversify your retirement investment portfolio by investing in your own business as well as stocks and mutual funds.
  • Attract and retain quality employees by offering a benefit not commonly found in small business.
  • Take advantage of high contribution limits under a 401(k) Plan.
  • Enjoy tax benefits generated by using a 401(k) Plan.
  • Work directly with our tax and ERISA professionals to establish an IRS and ERISA compliant structure that works best for you and your business.

Business Acquisition Solution

Invest in your future while gaining financial independence tax-free!

Use your retirement funds to start a new business and earn a salary.

We have developed a process that ensures speed and compliance, by using standardized procedures that work via phone, e-mail, fax, and mail. Your funds will be ready for investment into your new or existing business within 14-21 days.

Call us today at 800-472-0646 to learn more about how you can use your retirement funds to start a new business or grow an existing business tax-free, in full IRS compliance, and without penalties!

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