Jun 26

When Using ROBS to Fund a Business, What Type of Corporation Should You Use?

The Internal Revenue Code and ERISA law require the use of a “C” Corporation for using the Rollover Business Start-up solution (ROBS) to acquire stock in a business. The reason for this is that Section 407(d)(1) of ERISA defines the term “employer security,” in part, to mean a security issued by an employer of employees by the plan, or by an affiliate of such employer. Under section 407(d)(5) of ERISA, the term “qualifying employer security” includes an employer security, which has been understood to mean stock. The term “stock” is not defined in Title I of ERISA, however, most tax commentators believe this to mean the stock of a corporation and not an interest in a limited liability company or partnership. The use of an S Corporation for this structure is not permitted because a qualified plan cannot be an S Corporation shareholder. Generally only individuals are permitted to be S Corporation shareholders.

When Using ROBS to Fund a Business, What Type of Corporation Should You Use?

Please contact one of our ROBS Experts at 800-472-0646 for more information.
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Jun 22

IRA Financial Group Announces New Solo 401(k) Plan Annual Services to Include Filing of IRS Form 5500-EZ

Solo 401(k) plan clients of the IRA Financial Group to be offered IRS Form 5500-EZ completion services

IRA Financial Group, the leading provider of self-directed IRA and Solo 401(k) plans, announces a new service for its annual tax and compliance service for Solo 401(k) plan clients to include the completion of the annual IRS information form – 5500-EZ.

“In light of increased demand from our clients, we have decided to expand our annual tax and compliance service to include the completion of the IRS Form 5500-EZ for no additional fee for Solo 401(k) 5500 plan clients with plan assets exceeding $250,000 for the 2016 taxable year,” stated Jen Martin, a self-directed solo 401(k) plan specialist with the IRA Financial Group. “With more and more solo 401(k) plan clients having plan assets exceeding $250,000, offering 5500-EZ filing services became something we had to do,” stated Adam Bergman, a partner with the IRA Financial Group.

 IRA Financial Group Announces New Solo 401(k) Plan Annual Services to Include Filing of IRS Form 5500-EZA Solo 401(k), also known as an individual 401(k) or self-employed 401(k) plan was created specifically for sole proprietors, small businesses and independent contractors such as consultants. A Solo 401(k) Plan can be adopted by any business with no employees other than the owner(s). The business can be established as a sole proprietorship, LLC, corporation, or partnership. With a Solo 401(k) plan, there is generally no annual filing requirement unless the solo 401(k) plan participant’s plan assets exceed $250,000 in assets. In such a case, the Solo 401(k) Plan participant will need to file a short information return with the IRS (Form 5500-EZ). The IRS Form 5500-EZ is due on July 31, 2017 for the 2016 taxable year.

For 2017, the Solo 401(k) Plan, offers one the ability to make annual contributions of up to $54,000 ($60,000 for those over the age of 50), borrow up to $50,000, as well as use his or her retirement funds to make almost any type of investment on their own tax-free and penalty free without requiring the consent of any custodian or person.

The IRA Financial Group was founded by a group of top law firm tax and ERISA lawyers who have worked at some of the largest law firms in the United States, such as White & Case LLP, Dewey & LeBoeuf LLP, and Thelen LLP.

To learn more about the IRA Financial Group please visit our website at http://www.irafinancialgroup.com or call 800-472-0646.

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Jun 20

Does the UBTI Tax on Unrelated Debt Financed Income Apply to Solo 401k Plans?

No. Unlike a Self Directed IRA LLC, when a Solo 401K Plan uses nonrecourse leverage to purchase real estate that is leveraged, it is exempt from paying any Unrelated Business Taxable Income (UBTI) tax on the income or gain generated.

When an IRA buys real estate that is leveraged with mortgage financing, it creates Unrelated Debt Financed Income (a type of Unrelated Business Taxable Income) on which taxes must be paid. A Solo 401(k) plan is exempt from UDFI pursuant to Internal Revenue Code Section 514(c)(9).

With the UBTI tax rates at approximately 40% for 2017, the Solo 401(k) Plan offers real estate investors looking to use nonrecourse leverage in a transaction with a tax efficient solution.

Does the UBTI Tax on Unrelated Debt Financed Income Apply to Solo 401k Plans?“Debt-financed property” refers to borrowing money to purchase the real estate (i.e., a leveraged asset that is held to produce income). In such cases, only the income attributable to the financed portion of the property is taxed; gain on the profit from the sale of the leveraged assets is also UDFI (unless the debt is paid off more than 12 months before the property is sold).

Why does this Exemption Apply to 401(k) Plans and Not IRAs?

When Internal Revenue Code Section 514(c)(9) was enacted in 1980, it applied only to qualified pension, profit sharing, and stock bonus plans, but its scope was broadened in 1984 to include schools, colleges, and universities. The provision brings the history of Internal Revenue Code Section 514 full circle by exempting some organizations, such as 401(k) Qualified Plan, from tax on income from the very sort of leveraged real estate deals that provoked the enactment of the predecessor of Internal Revenue Code Section 514 in 1950. As per the legislative history, the only reason given in the committee reports for the exemption is that some people wanted it: “Trustees of these plans are desirous of investing in real estate for diversification and to offset inflation. Debt-financing is common in real estate investments.”

Please contact one of our 401(k) Experts at 800-472-0646 for more information.

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Jun 17

What Are the Advantages of a Solo 401k Plan vs a Self-Directed IRA?

A Solo 401(k) Plan is an IRS approved retirement plan, which is suited for business owners who do not have any employees other than themselves and perhaps their spouse. The “one-participant 401(k) Plan” or individual 401(k) Plan is not a new type of plan. It is a traditional 401k Plan covering only one employee.  Unlike a Traditional IRA, which only allows an individual to contribute $5500 annually or $6500 if the individual is over the age of 50, a Solo 401k Plan offers the Plan participant the ability to contribute up to $60,000 each year.  Before the Economic Growth and Tax Relief Reconciliation Act of 2001 (EGTRRA) became effective in 2002, there was no compelling reason for an owner-only business to establish a Solo 401(k) Plan because the business owner could generally receive the same benefits by adopting a profit sharing plan or a SEP IRA.  After 2002, EGTRRA paved the way for an owner-only business to put more money aside for retirement and to operate a more cost-effective retirement plan than a Traditional IRA or 401(k) Plan.

There are a number of options that are specific to Solo 401k Plans that make the Solo 401k Plan a far more attractive retirement option for a self-employed individual than a Traditional IRA for a self-employed individual.

1. Reach your Maximum Contribution Amount Quicker: A Solo 401(k) Plan includes both an employee and profit sharing contribution option, whereas, a Traditional IRA has a very low annual contribution limit.

Under the 2017 Solo 401(k) contribution rules, a plan participant under the age of 50 can make a maximum employee deferral contribution in the amount of $18,000. That amount can be made in pre-tax or after-tax (Roth). On the profit sharing side, the business can make a 25% (20% in the case of a sole proprietorship or single member LLC) profit sharing contribution up to a combined maximum, including the employee deferral, of $54,000.

What Are the Advantages of a Solo 401k Plan vs a Self-Directed IRA?For plan participants over the age of 50, an individual can make a maximum employee deferral contribution in the amount of $24,000. That amount can be made in pre-tax or after-tax (Roth). On the profit sharing side, the business can make a 25% (20% in the case of a sole proprietorship or single member LLC) profit sharing contribution up to a combined maximum, including the employee deferral, of $60,000.

Whereas, a Traditional Self-Directed IRA would only allow an individual with earned income during the year to contribute up to $5500, $6500 if the individual is over the age of 50.

For example, Joe, who is 60 years old, owns 100% of an S Corporation with no full time employees.  Joe earned $100,000 in self-employment W-2 wages for 2017.  If Joe had a Solo 401(k) Plan established for 2017, Joe would be able to defer approximately $49,000 for 2017 (a $24,000 employee deferral, which could be pre-tax or Roth, and 25% of his compensation giving him $49,000 for the year).   Whereas, if Joe established a Traditional Self-Directed IRA, Joe would only be able to defer approximately $6,500 for 2017.

2. No Roth Feature: A Solo 401k Plan can be made in pre-tax or Roth (after-tax) format.  Whereas, in the case of a Traditional Self-Directed IRA, contributions can only be made in pre-tax format.  In addition, a contribution of $18,000 ($24,00, if the plan participant is over the age of 50) can be made to a Solo 401(k) Roth account.

3. Tax-Free Loan Option: With a Solo 401K Plan, you can borrow up to $50,000 or 50% of your account value, what ever is less.  The loan can be used for any purpose.  With a Traditional Self-Directed IRA, the IRA holder is not permitted to borrow even $1 dollar from the IRA without triggering a prohibited transaction.

4. Use Nonrecourse Leverage and Pay No Tax: With a Solo 401(k) Plan, you can make a real estate investment using nonrecourse funds without triggering the Unrelated Debt Financed Income Rules and the Unrelated Business Taxable Income (UBTI or UBIT) tax (IRC 514).  However, the nonrecourse leverage exception found in IRC 514 is only applicable to 401(k) qualified retirement plans and does not apply to IRAs. In other words, using a Self-Directed SEP IRA to make a real estate investment (Self Directed Real Estate IRA) involving nonrecourse financing would trigger the UBTI tax.

5. Open the Account at Any Local Bank: With a Solo 401k Plan, the 401k bank account can be opened at any local bank or trust company.  However, in the case of a Traditional Self Directed IRA, a special IRA custodian is required to hold the IRA funds.

6. No Need for the Cost of an LLC: With a Solo 401(k) Plan, the plan itself can make real estate and other investments without the need for an LLC, which, depending on the state of formation, could prove costly. Since a 401(k) Plan is a trust, the trustee on behalf of the trust can take title to a real estate asset without the need for an LLC.

7. Better Creditor Protection: In general, a Solo 401(k) Plan offers greater creditor protection than a Traditional IRA.  The 2005 Bankruptcy Act generally protects all 401(k) Plan assets from creditor attack in a bankruptcy proceeding.  In addition, most states offer greater creditor protection to a Solo 401(k) qualified retirement plan than a Traditional Self-Directed IRA outside of bankruptcy.

The Solo 401k plan is unique and so popular because it is designed explicitly for small, owner-only business.  The many features of the Solo 401k plan discussed above is why the Solo 401k Plan or Individual 401k Plan it so appealing and popular among self-employed business owners.

To learn more about the benefits of a Solo 401(k) Plan vs. a Self-Directed IRA, please contact a tax professional at 800-472-0646.

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Jun 14

Using Your Self-Directed Solo 401k Plan to Invest in Real Estate

Most people mistakenly believe that their 401(k) must be invested in bank CDs, the stock market, or mutual funds. Few Investors realize that the IRS has always permitted real estate to be held inside 401(k) retirement accounts. Investments in real estate with an Individual 401(k), also known as a Solo 401(k), are fully permissible under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA). IRS rules permit you to engage in almost any type of real estate investment, aside generally from any investment involving a disqualified person.

Advantages of Using a Solo 401(k) to Purchase Real Estate

Income or gains generated by a 401(k) Plan generate tax-deferred/tax-free profits. Using a Solo 401(k) Plan to purchase real estate allows Using a Solo 401(k) To Purchase Real Estatethe 401(k) to earn tax-free income/gains and pay taxes at a future date, rather than in the year the investment produces income.

With a Solo 401(k), you can invest tax-free and not have to pay taxes right away – or in most cases for many years allowing your retirement funds to grow tax-free! All the income or gains from your real estate deals flow though to your 401(k) account tax-free!

Types of Real Estate Investments

Below is a partial list of domestic or foreign real estate-related investments that you can make with a Solo 401(k):

  • Raw land
  • Residential homes
  • Commercial property
  • Apartments
  • Duplexes
  • Condos/townhomes
  • Mobile homes
  • Real estate notes
  • Real estate purchase options
  • Tax liens certificates
  • Tax deeds

Investing in Real Estate with a Solo 401(k) is Quick & Easy!

Purchasing real estate with a Solo 401(k) Plan is essentially the same as purchasing real estate personally.

  • Set-up a Solo 401(k) Plan with the IRA Financial Group.
  • Identify the investment property.
  • Purchase the investment property with the Solo 401(k) Plan – no need to seek the consent of the custodian with a Solo 401(k) Plan since you serve as Trustee and Plan Administrator.
  • Title to the investment property and all transaction documents should be in the name of the Solo 401(k) Plan. Documents pertaining to the property investment must be signed by you as Trustee.
  • All expenses paid from the investment property go through the Solo 401(k) Plan. Likewise, all rental income checks must be deposited directly in to the Solo 401(k) Plan bank account. No 401(k) related investment checks should be deposited into your personal accounts.
  • All income or gains from the investment flow through to your 401(k) tax-free!

Solo 401K Solution

Structuring the Purchase of Real Estate with a Solo 401(k) Plan

When using a Solo 401(k) to make a real estate investment there are a number of ways you can structure the transaction:

1. Use your Solo 401(k) funds to make 100% of the investment

If you have enough funds in your Solo 401(k) to cover the entire real estate purchase, including closing costs, taxes, fees, insurance, you may make the purchase outright using your Solo 401(k). All ongoing expenses relating to the real estate investment must be paid out of your Solo 401(k) bank account. In addition, all income or gains relating to your real estate investment must be returned to your Solo 401(k) bank account.

2. Partner with Family, Friends, Colleagues

If you don’t have sufficient funds in your Solo 401(k) to make a real estate purchase outright, your Solo 401(k) can purchase an interest in the property along with a family member (non-disqualified person), friend, or colleague. The investment would not be made into an entity owned by the 401(k) owner, but instead would be invested directly into the property.

For example, your Solo 401(k) Plan could partner with a family member, friend, or colleague to purchase a piece of property for $150,000. Your Solo 401(k) Plan could purchase an interest in the property (i.e. 50% for $75,000) and your family member, friend, or colleague could purchase the remaining interest (i.e. 50% for $75,000).

All income or gain from the property would be allocated to the parties in relation to their percentage of ownership in the property. Likewise, all property expenses must be paid in relation to the parties’ percentage of ownership in the property. Based on the above example, for a $2,000 property tax bill, the Solo 401(k) would be responsible for 50% of the bill ($1000) and the family member, friend, or colleague would be responsible for the remaining $1000 (50%).

Isn’t Partnering with a family member in a Real Estate Transaction a Prohibited Transaction?

Likely not if the transaction is structured correctly. Investing in an investment entity with a family member and investing in an investment property directly are two different transaction structures that impact whether the transaction will be prohibited under Code Section 4975. The different tax treatment is based on who currently owns the investment. Using a Solo 401(k) Plan to invest in an entity that is owned by a family member who is a disqualified person will likely be treated as a prohibited transaction. However, partnering with a family member that is a non-disqualified person directly into an investment property would likely not be a prohibited transaction. Note: If you, a family member, or other disqualified person already owns a property, then investing in that property with your Solo 401(k) would be prohibited.

3. Borrow Money for your Solo 401(k)

You may obtain financing through a loan or mortgage to finance a real estate purchase using a Solo 401(k). Solo 401(k) participants can also borrow up to either $50,000 or 50% of their account value – whichever is less to help finance a real estate investment.

If using financing through a third-party loan to purchase real estate (other than a loan from the 401(k) Plan), one important point must be considered when selecting this option:

  • Loan must be non-recourse – A “prohibited transaction” is a transaction that, directly or indirectly involves the loan of money or other extension of credit between a plan and a disqualified person. Normally, when an individual purchases real estate with a mortgage, the traditional loan provides for recourse against the borrower (i.e., personal liability for the mortgage). However, if the 401(k) Plan purchases real estate and secures a mortgage for the purchase, the loan must be non-recourse; otherwise there will be a prohibited transaction. A non-recourse loan only uses the property for collateral. In the event of default, the lender can collect only the property and cannot go after the 401(k) Plan itself.

Note: Unlike a Self-Directed IRA LLC, pursuant to Internal Revenue Code Section 514(c)(9), in the case of a Solo 401(k) Plan, the Unrelated Business Income Tax (UBTI) does not apply when using nonrecourse leverage as part of a real estate transaction (unrelated debt-financed income – UDFI). Therefore, unlike a Self-Directed IRA LLC, using a Solo 401K to finance a real estate investment will not trigger UBTI – which imposes a tax in the range of 40% for 2017 on all income/gains relating to the debt financed portion of the investment.

To learn more about using a Solo 401(k) Plan to invest in real estate, please contact one of our Solo 401(k) Plan Experts at 800-472-0646 for more information.

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Jun 12

Why Should You Use IRA Financial Group for Your Individual 401k Plan?

IRA Financial Group is one of the top Solo 401(k) plan facilitators in the country.  Here are just a few reasons why you should consider us for your self-employed retirement needs –

Excellence: Our in-house retirement tax professionals have worked at some of the largest law firms in the United States, including White & Case LLP and Dewey & LeBoeuf LLP. Their tax and ERISA experience is unmatched in the industry and is the reason we are considered the leading facilitator of true “Checkbook Control” Solo 401K Plan structures.

Why Should You Use IRA Financial Group for Your Individual 401k Plan?Work directly with our in-house retirement tax professionals to set-up an IRS compliant Solo 401K Plan. Our clients have direct access to our in-house retirement tax professionals to ensure that the Solo 401K Plan is customized to satisfy the client’s retirement and investment objectives. In fact, we encourage our clients to contact our in-house retirement tax professionals with any tax and ERISA questions concerning the structure or a proposed investment to ensure full IRS compliance.

Our Solo 401K experts will take care of the entire set-up of your IRS compliant Solo 401k Plan. Our Solo 401k Plan experts and tax and ERISA professionals are on site greatly reducing the set-up time and cost. You will find that our fee for this service is significantly less than other companies that perform the same or similar services.

Leader: IRA Financial Group is the markets leading provider of Solo 401(k) Plans. We have helped thousands of clients take back control over their retirement funds while gaining the ability to invest in almost any type of investments.

Value: We strive to offer our clients customized Solo 401(k) Plans at a fair and reasonable price. Whereas our competitors are forced to outsource much or all of their tax work and consultation, each client of the IRA Financial Group is assigned to one of our in-house retirement tax professionals allowing us to offer customized Solo 401(k) Plans for significantly less than our competitors.

We provide the following all for one low price:

  • Free tax consultation with our in-house tax and ERISA professionals
  • Adoption Agreement
  • Basic Plan Document
  • EGTRRA Amendment
  • Summary Plan Description
  • Trust Agreement
  • Appointment of Trustee
  • Beneficiary Designation
  • Loan Procedure
  • Loan Promissory Note
  • Free tax updates
  • Free tax and ERISA support
  • Satisfaction Guaranteed!

Integrity: We are guided by the rules of ethical conduct in all that we do. Our relationships with clients are built on trust, respect, and confidentiality.

Innovate: We anticipate the changing tax and financial needs of our clients and creatively adapt our Solo 401(k) Plan tax solutions to address them.

Results: We are committed to our clients’ satisfaction and strive to meet and exceed our clients’ expectations.

IRA Financial Group will take care of everything. The whole process can be handled by phone, email, fax, or mail. Our expert tax and ERISA professionals are on site greatly reducing the set-up time and cost. Most importantly, you will find that our fee for this service is significantly less than other companies that perform the same or similar services.

Please contact one of our IRA Experts at 800-472-0646 for more information.

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Jun 08

IRA Financial Group Individual 401k vs. Scottrade

The Solo 401K Plan, also known as the Individual 401K or Self Directed 401K Plan is an IRS approved plan that was designed specifically for the self-employed or small business owner with no employees other than the owners(s). Since the adoption of the 2002 Economic Growth and Tax Reconciliation Act, the Solo 401K Plan has become the most popular retirement plan for the self-employed.

When it comes to deciding what type of Solo 401K plan is best for you and your business, it is important to look at all the options the plan provides to make sure it will satisfy your retirement planning, tax, and investment goals.

Most banks and financial institutions, such as Scottrade offer Solo 401K Plans. The Solo 401K Plans are typically quite restrictive and only permit the plan participant to make limited investments without benefiting from most of the available IRS approved options such as the tax-free loan and Roth contributions. However, if you do not want to be forced to invest all your hard earn retirement savings in the stock market, than the Scottrade Solo 401K Plans may end up not being very attractive.  In addition, the Scottrade Solo 401K Plans will not offer a loan feature or allow you to make Roth Type contributions.

IRA Financial Group’s Solo 401K plan is unique and so popular because it is designed explicitly for small, owner only business.

Unlike Scottrade’s Solo 401K Plan, by adopting IRA Financial Group’s Solo 401K Plan, you can serve as trustee of the plan and make traditional investments as well as non-traditional investments such as real estate tax-free and without custodian consent.

IRA Financial Group Individual 401k vs. Scottrade

Have an investment you want to make with your retirement funds, like real estate, but Scottrade won’t let you do it even though it ‘s approved by the IRS?  Then IRA Financial Group’s Solo 401K Plan is your solution.

Make high Tax-Free Contributions: Similar to the Scottrade Solo 401K Plan, with IRA Financial Group’s Solo 401K Plan you can to make tax-deductible annual contributions up to $54,000 annually with an additional $6,000 catch up contribution for those over age 50 for 2017.

Tax-Free Loan:  Fidelity Solo 401K Plan offers no loan feature, while IRA Financial Group’s Solo 401K Plan allows plan participants to borrow up to $50,000 or 50% of their account value (whichever is less) for any purpose. The loan has to be paid back over a five-year period at least quarterly at a minimum Prime interest rate (you have the option of selecting a higher interest rate)

Checkbook Control: The most significant advantage of the IRA Financial Group Solo 401k Plan versus the Scottrade Solo 401K Plan is that it offers you checkbook control over your retirement funds. With the Scottrade Solo 401K Plan, the plan participant is relegated to making traditional investments such as stocks and or mutual funds.  In addition, the Solo 401KPlan account is required to be opened at Scottrade.  With IRA Financial Group’s Solo 401K Plan, the plan account can be opened at any local bank, including Chase, Wells Fargo, and even Fidelity.  In addition, with IRA Financial Group’s Solo 401K Plan, the plan participant can make almost any traditional as well as non-traditional investments, such as real estate, precious metals, tax liens, third-party lending, notes, stock, private business, and much more. With IRA financial Group’s Solo 401K Plan, the Plan participant has the freedom to make the investments he or she wants while at the same time to open the 401K account at any local bank or credit union. With IRA Financial Group’s Solo 401K Plan, you can serve as the trustee of the plan giving you checkbook control over your retirement funds. In contrast to Scottrade’s Solo 401K Plan, which restricts your investment opportunities to stocks and mutual funds, with IRA Financial Group’s Solo 401K Plan, making a traditional as well as non-traditional investment such as real estate is as simple as writing a check.

After-Tax Contributions: Scottrade’s Solo 401K Plan does not allow for Roth or after-tax contributions. IRA Financial Group’s Solo 401K Plan contains a built in Roth sub-account which can be contributed to without any income restrictions.  In addition, Scottrade’s Solo 401K Plan does not allow for in-plan Roth conversions or rollovers.  Whereas, IRA Financial Group’s Solo 401K Plan allows for in-plan Roth conversions. However, the Solo 401K Plan participant must pay income tax on the amount converted.

Easy Administration:  Like Scottrade’s Solo 401K Plan, IRA Financial Group’s Solo 401K Plan is easy to operate. There is generally no annual filing requirement unless your solo 401K Plan exceeds $250,000 in assets, in which case you will need to file a short information return with the IRS (Form 5500-EZ). 
Unlike Scottrade, however, the tax attorneys at the IRA Financial Group will assist you in completing this form is required

No Tax on Real Estate Financing:  Since the Scottrade Solo 401K Plan does allow for real estate investments, you would not be able to benefit from the ability to use nonrecourse financing tax-free when making real estate investments with Solo 401K retirement funds. IRA Financial Group’s Solo 401K Plan will allow one to use nonrecourse leverage tax-free when making real estate investments with plan assets.

IRA Financial Group will take care of setting up your entire Solo 401k Plan. The whole process can be handled by phone, email, fax, or mail and typically takes between 2-7 days to complete, the timing largely depending on the state of formation and the custodian holding your retirement funds. Our 401k experts and tax and ERISA attorneys are on site greatly reducing the set-up time and cost. Most importantly, each client of the IRA Financial Group is assigned a tax attorney to help with the establishment of the Solo 401k Plan. You will find that our fee for this service is significantly less than other companies that perform the same or similar services.

To learn more about the advantages of choosing the IRA Financial Group’s Solo 401K Plan over the Scottrade Solo 401K Plan, please contact a tax professional at 800-472-0646 or visit www.irafinancialgroup.com.

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Jun 05

Millennials Using Solo 401(k) Plan Loan Option to Enter Housing Market

401(k) Plan loan feature helping first-time home buyers secure necessary funds to purchase a home

IRA Financial Group, the leading provider of solo 401(k) plans for self-employed and small business owners, has seen a growing number of millennials who are first time home buyers using the 401(k) plan loan feature to purchase a home, according to an IRA Financial Group internal report. Internal Revenue Code Section 72(p) allows an individual 401K Plan participant to take a loan from his or her 401K Plan so as long as it is permitted pursuant to the business’s 401K Plan documents.

Millennials Using Solo 401(k) Plan Loan Option to Enter Housing MarketA solo 401k loan is permitted at any time using the accumulated balance of the solo 401k as collateral for the loan. A Solo 401(k) participant can borrow up to either $50,000 or 50% of their account value – whichever is less. This loan has to be repaid over an amortization schedule of five years or less with payment frequency no less than quarterly. However, in the loan proceed will be used to purchase a primary residence, the term of the loan could be extended to a longer term, generally fifteen or thirty years. The lowest interest rate that can be used is prime as per the Wall Street Journal, which as of May 30, 2017 is 4.00%. “In 2017, we have seen a growing number of millennials seeking to use the 401(k) loan option as a way to finance the purchase of a primary residence, which in many cases is their first home purchase,” stated Adam Bergman, a partner with the IRA Financial Group.

With IRA Financial Group’s Solo 401K plan loan feature, an entrepreneur who is self-employed individual or small business owner with no employees can borrow up to $50,000 tax-free and penalty-free. There are no penalties or taxes due provided loan payments are paid on time. “The Solo 401(k) loan feature has proved to be an attractive way to get tax-free and penalty-free use of up to $50,000 of retirement funds that can be used for any purpose, including the purchase or financing of a primary residence,” stated Mr. Bergman.

The IRA Financial Group was founded by a group of top law firm tax and ERISA lawyers who have worked at some of the largest law firms in the United States, such as White & Case LLP, Dewey & LeBoeuf LLP, and Thelen LLP.

IRA Financial Group is the market’s leading provider of self-directed IRA LLC and Solo 401(k) plans. IRA Financial Group has helped thousands of clients take back control over their retirement funds while gaining the ability to invest in almost any type of investment, including real estate without custodian consent.

To learn more about the IRA Financial Group please visit our website at http://www.irafinancialgroup.com or call 800-472-0646.

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Jun 01

Is a Solo 401(k) Plan Subject to the Same UBTI Rules as a Self Directed IRA?

Yes and No. Like an IRA, the tax advantage of a Solo 401K Plan is that income is tax-free until distributed. In general, an exempt organization is not taxed on its income from an activity that is substantially related to the charitable, educational, or other purpose that is the basis for the organization’s exemption. Such income is exempt even if the activity is a trade or business. However, to prevent tax-exempt entities from competing unfairly with taxable entities, tax-exempt entities are subject to unrelated business taxable income (UBTI) when their income is derived from any trade or business that is unrelated to its tax-exempt status.

What is Unrelated Business Taxable Income?

UBTI is defined as “gross income derived by any organization from any unrelated trade or business regularly carried on by it” reduced by deductions directly connected with the business. The UBTI rules only apply to exempt organizations such as charities, IRAs, and 401(k) Plans. Congress enacted the UBTI rules in the 1950s in order to prevent charities from competing with for-profit businesses since charities do not pay tax giving them an unfair advantage over for- profit businesses. With the enactment of ERISA in 1974, IRAs and 401(k), who are considered tax-exempt parties pursuant to Internal Revenue Code Sections 408 and 401 respectively, became subject to the UBTI rules. As a result, if an IRA or 401(k) invests in an active business through an LLC or partnership, the income generated by the IRA or 401(k) Is a Solo 401(k) Plan Subject to the Same UBTI Rules as a Self Directed IRA?from the active business investment will be subject to the UBTI rules. In other words, a 401(k) Plan that is a limited partner, member of a LLC, or member of another non-corporate entity will have attributed to it the UBTI of the enterprise as if it were the direct recipient of its share of the entity’s income which would be UBTI had it carried on the business of the entity.   For example, if a Solo 401(k) Plan invests in an LLC that operates an active business such as a restaurant or gas station, the income or gains generated from the investment will generally be subject to the UBTI tax. However, if the Solo 401(k) Plan invested in an active business through a C corporation, there would be no UBTI since the C Corporation acts as a blocker blocking the income from flowing through to the Solo 401(k) Plan. This is why you can invest IRA and 401(k) funds into a public company, such as IBM without triggering the UBTI tax. Remember that if an IRA or 401(k) Plan makes a passive investment, such as rental income, dividends, and royalties, such income would not be subject to the UBTI rules.

UDFI and The Solo 401(k) Plan

However, unlike a Self-Directed IRA LLC, in the case of a Solo 401(k) Plan, UBTI does not apply to unrelated debt-financed income (UDFI). The UDFI rules apply when a 401(k) Plan uses leverage to acquire property such as real estate. Pursuant to Internal Revenue Code Section 514(c)(9), a 401(k) Qualified Plan is not subject to the UDFI rules and, thus, the UBTI tax if nonrecourse leverage is used to acquire property such as real estate. With the UBTI tax rates at approximately 40% for 2017, the Solo 401(k) Plan offers real estate investors looking to use nonrecourse leverage in a transaction with a tax efficient solution.

Exceptions to the UBTI Rules

There are some important exceptions from UBTI: those exclusions generally exclude the majority of income generating investment activities from the UBTI rules – dividends, interest, annuities, royalties, most rentals from real estate, and gains/losses from the sale of real estate.

What is an Unrelated Business?

For a Solo 401(k), any business regularly carried on or by a partnership or corporation of which it is a member/partner is an unrelated business. For example, the operation of a shoe factory by a pension trusts, the operation of a financial consulting business for high net worth individuals by a university, or the operation of an computer rental business by a hospital would likely be treated as an unrelated business and subject to UBTI.

UBTI & Real Estate Investments

Although there is little formal guidance on UBTI implications for Solo 401(k) Plans investing in real estate, there is a great deal of guidance on UBTI implications for real estate transactions by tax-exempt entities. In general, Gains and losses on dispositions of property (including casualties and other involuntary dispositions) are excluded from UBTI unless the property is inventory or property held primarily for sale to customers in the ordinary course of an unrelated trade or business. This exclusion covers gains and losses on dispositions of property used in an unrelated trade or business, as long as the property was not held for sale to customers. In addition, subject to a number of conditions, if an exempt organization acquires real property or mortgages held by a financial institution in conservatorship or receivership, gains on dispositions of the property are excluded from UBTI, even if the property is held for sale to customers in the ordinary course of business. The purpose of the provision seems to be to allow an exempt organization to acquire a package of assets of an insolvent financial institution with assurance that parts of the package can be sold off without risk of the re-sales tainting the organization as a dealer and thus subjecting gains on re-sales to the UBIT.

How Do I Avoid UBTI?

In general, if you make passive investments with your Solo 401(k) Plan, such as stocks, mutual funds, precious metals, foreign currency, rental real estate, etc the passive income generated by the investment will generally not be subject to the UBTI tax. Only if your Solo 401(k) Plan will be making investments into an active business, such as a retail store, restaurant, software company using a passthrough entity such as an LLC or partnership will your Solo 401(k) Plan likely be subject to the UBTI tax.

Please contact one of our 401(k) Experts at 800-472-0646 for more information.

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May 30

What Are Your Options if Your Inherit a Solo 401k Plan?

If you are a beneficiary (rather than the owner) of a qualified plan, such as a Solo 401(k), and receive a distribution as a result of the owner’s death, in general you have the following options:

  • Pay ordinary income tax: If plan assets are distributed to you, then you will have to report the distribution as income on your tax return. However, if you receive a distribution from a plan you inherited, you will not have to pay an early distribution tax, even if you are younger than 59 1/2. The penalty is waived for inherited plans.
  • Roll over the distribution: If you inherit a qualified plan and you were the spouse of the original owner, you can roll over the distribution into a traditional or Roth IRA. However, if you inherit a retirement plan, such as a 401(k) Plan, and you were not the spouse of the original owner, then you may roll over the plan assets into a traditional IRA only if you follow certain rules. For example, you may not roll over the assets into a plan or IRA that is in your own name (you must establish a new IRA that is titled in the name of the deceased with you as the designated beneficiary).
  • Convert to a Roth IRA: A spouse that inherits a retirement plan is provided virtually all of the distribution options offered to the deceased plan participant. Beginning in 2008, non-spouse beneficiaries also have the options to transfer the assets to a Roth IRA subject to certain rules.
  • Use ten-year averaging.

Please contact one of our 401(k) Experts at 800-472-0646 for more information.